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At the moment, I have no other way than this one (an indirect update):

private void UpdateKey(Dictionary<string,object> dict, string oldKey, string newKey){
    if(dict.ContainsKey(oldKey)){
          object value = dict[oldKey];
          dict.Remove(oldKey);
          dict.Add(newKey,value);
    }
}

Do you have another better way?

Of course the above method is just a simple one, to make it work well without throwing any exception, we have to check the newKey for duplication with already keys in the Dictionary. Like this:

private void UpdateKey(Dictionary<string,object> dict, string oldKey, string newKey){
    if(dict.ContainsKey(oldKey)){
          object value = dict[oldKey];
          dict.Remove(oldKey);              
          dict[newKey] = value;
    }
}

Thank you very much in advance!

share|improve this question
3  
Removing and re-adding is the only way. The key is used as the identity for the value, so it is not logically possible for a key to change; that would imply that the key was referring to a different entity. Dictionary adheres to this viewpoint. –  Matthew Watson Apr 27 '13 at 18:10
2  
If you have to do it a lot, it may be better to use another data structure. –  Hossein Narimani Rad Apr 27 '13 at 18:11
2  
Why would you need that? –  anouar.bagari Apr 27 '13 at 18:14
    
@anouar.bag I would like to know if there is a better way, when I wanted to update the key, this code sprung in my mind, doing thing in a better way is always what we want. Thank you =) –  King King Apr 27 '13 at 18:18
1  
If you use the assignment (really a call to the indexer setter) dict[newKey] = value; without first checking if newKey is already in dict, the key/value pair will be added if the key is really new, or the value will be updated if the key is old. This is different from dict.Add(newKey, value) which will throw if newKey is "old". –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Apr 27 '13 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would use TryGetValue method instead of Contains:

private void UpdateKey(Dictionary<string,object> dict, string oldKey, string newKey){
    object value;
    if(dict.TryGetValue(oldKey, out value)){
          dict.Remove(oldKey);
          dict.Add(newKey, value);
    }
}

But you still need to get value first, add it with another key and remove the old one. You can't do it any other way.

By the way: you can make the method generic to operate on more then just one dictionary type:

private static void UpdateKey<TKye, TValue>(Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dict, TKey oldKey, TKey newKey){
    TValue value;
    if(dict.TryGetValue(oldKey, out value)){
          dict.Remove(oldKey);
          dict.Add(newKey, value);
    }
}

Or you can event write your own Extension method on IDictionary<TKey, TValue>:

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static void UpdateKey<TKye, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dict, TKey oldKey, TKey newKey){
        TValue value;
        if(dict.TryGetValue(oldKey, out value)){
              dict.Remove(oldKey);
              dict.Add(newKey, value);
        }
    }
}

and then call it like standard Dictionary method:

myDict.UpdateKey(oldKey, newKey);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, my code is just for demonstrative purpose. I like your TryGetValue approach. Thanks! –  King King Apr 27 '13 at 18:14

There is no such option, because changing key is not a simple replacement, but a complex operation that may require rebuilding internal dictionary structures.

If the dictionary had such method, it would do the same - remove and add.

To simplify your code, you can create an extension method that will do just that.

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Briefly, no. You have to remove and re-add it. If there was a built in method to do this it'd have to do the same thing.

Think about what you are asking you will see why removal and add is the logical way this has to be done. Think about how a dictionary might be implemented underneath the hood. What would it mean to change a key?

First the dictionary keeps a struct of entries. Since each entry is is a struct it is value typed and therefore cannot be updated in place. Granted, an Entry can be represented as an object rather than the struct, but what would he purpose be for this? It would be a less efficient way to deal with the data for what is really a marginal edge case.

Second at the basic level a dictionary is mapping a hash value to an item. Since there are a finite number of hashes what is actually mapped in a more complicated way using a buckets. This means you can't just simply change the value in place (even if the underlying structure allowed us to do this). What you basically have to do in this case is remove the key and mappings and then add them back. In which case the code is doing what you wrote.

In general keys should be things about the value that are not going to change precisely because of this difficulty so there is not built in method to do what you wrote (granted it could be done cleaner than what you wrote), but the basic operation has to be a remove and add regardless of where or how it is implemented.

Look at the source code to see the details of how a dictionary actually works to understand in a deeper way.

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Thank you very much (+1) :) –  King King Apr 27 '13 at 18:38

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