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I have got a function which I need to pass a value to for read-only purposes only.

For example:

unsigned short strlen(String str)
{
  short i = 0;
  while(str[i] != '\0')
    i++;
  return i;
}

As you can see, I do not want to change the original value I work with, I only need to read its length. Would it - in terms of performance - be better to replace the parameter String str, which is making a copy of the original variable, by a reference like String &str?

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I approach it like so - Pass by value if your function needs a copy, pass by reference if the parameter is required and you don't need a copy, pass by pointer if the parameter is optional –  Captain Obvlious Apr 27 '13 at 18:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Would it - in terms of performance - be better to replace the parameter String str, which is making a copy of the original variable, by a reference like String &str?

Yes, it would. Instead of creating a copy, which you do not seem to need here, a reference would be bound. Since you are not modifying the object, a reference to const would be better:

unsigned short strlen(String const& str)
//                           ^^^^^^
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Isn't const String & by far the more common spelling? I suspect they are the same, I just wonder why you'd write it in that order. –  delnan Apr 27 '13 at 18:13
1  
@delnan: I prefer this style because of uniformity (the const necessarily has to come after if you want to declare a const pointer, like int* const) and because it is easier to figure out what is going on with template type deduction –  Andy Prowl Apr 27 '13 at 18:14
1  
@delnan it is more common, and it means the same, it's just that string const reflects semantics better (const applies to whatever is on its left side, unless there's nothing there.) –  user529758 Apr 27 '13 at 18:15

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