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for a class project I have a 2D array of pointers. I understand the constructors, destructors, etc. but I'm having issues understanding how to set the values in the array. We're using the overloaded input operator to input the values. Here is the code I have for that operator so far:

istream& operator>>(istream& input, Matrix& matrix) 
{
bool inputCheck = false;
int cols;

while(inputCheck == false)
{
    cout << "Input Matrix: Enter # rows and # columns:" << endl; 

    input >> matrix.mRows >> cols;
    matrix.mCols = cols/2;

    //checking for invalid input
    if(matrix.mRows <= 0 || cols <= 0)
    {
        cout << "Input was invalid. Try using integers." << endl;
        inputCheck = false;
    }
    else
    {
        inputCheck = true;
    }

    input.clear();
    input.ignore(80, '\n');
}

if(inputCheck = true)
{
    cout << "Input the matrix:" << endl;

    for(int i=0;i< matrix.mRows;i++) 
    {
        Complex newComplex;
        input >> newComplex; 
        matrix.complexArray[i] = newComplex; //this line
    }
}
return input;
}

Obviously the assignment statement I have here is incorrect, but I'm not sure how it is supposed to work. If it's necessary that I include more code, let me know. This is what the main constructor looks like:

Matrix::Matrix(int r, int c)
{
if(r>0 && c>0)
{
    mRows = r;
    mCols = c;
}
else
{
    mRows = 0;
    mCols = 0;
}

if(mRows < MAX_ROWS && mCols < MAX_COLUMNS)
{
    complexArray= new compArrayPtr[mRows];

    for(int i=0;i<mRows;i++)
    {
        complexArray[i] = new Complex[mCols];
    }
}
}

and here is Matrix.h so you can see the attributes:

class Matrix
{
friend istream& operator>>(istream&, Matrix&);

friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const Matrix&);

private:
    int mRows;
    int mCols;
    static const int MAX_ROWS = 10;
    static const int MAX_COLUMNS = 15;
    //type is a pointer to an int type
    typedef Complex* compArrayPtr;
    //an array of pointers to int type
    compArrayPtr *complexArray;

public:

    Matrix(int=0,int=0);
            Matrix(Complex&);
    ~Matrix();
    Matrix(Matrix&);

};
#endif

the error I'm getting is "cannot convert Complex to Matrix::compArrayPtr (aka Complex*) in assignment" If anyone can explain what I'm doing wrong, I'd be very grateful.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your newComplex is an object of type Complex (a value) and you try to assign it to a Complex* pointer.

For this to work you should construct a complex dynamically:

Complex* newComplex = new Complex();
input >> *newComplex;
matrix.complexArray[i] = newComplex;

But be aware of all the consequences that come with dynamic allocation (memory management, ownership, shared state...).

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I think pointer here has a meaning of array (and so matrix is 2d array). –  Lol4t0 Apr 27 '13 at 18:39
    
@Lol4t0 No, complexArray is an array of pointers. The variable is dereferenced with the subscript and you end up with a pointer. –  pmr Apr 27 '13 at 18:43
    
thank you! your solution worked. –  bitva Apr 27 '13 at 18:48
    
@pmr, so, a pointer could be used as array. At least it would have sence. Because name Matrix advices that it should be mmm... matrix. –  Lol4t0 Apr 27 '13 at 18:48
    
@Lol4t0 Well, a pointer points to object storage. It can point to storage for more than one object which will make it somewhat like an array. If you just see a pointer in a program, there is no telling if it is used as an array or not. Anyway, many people will not implement a matrix through many-dimensional arrays. It is highly inefficient, so what you suspect isn't necessarily true. –  pmr Apr 27 '13 at 18:52
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