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I've been messing around with bitwise operator problems I've found on the internet and have found one that just completely stumps me.

int rpwr2(int x, int n)
{
   //Legal ops: ! ~ ^ | + << >>

   //My attempt at a solution:
   int power = (1 << n) + ~0;
   return x & power;
}
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9  
So what's the question? – feralin Apr 27 '13 at 18:53
    
The program that checks the answer is saying that it is incorrect: "Test rempwr2(-2147483647[0x80000001], 1[0x1]) failed... ... Gives 1[0x1]. Should be -1[0xffffffff]" – P Dutt Apr 27 '13 at 18:56
    
Does it have to be portable, or can we assume two's complement and arithmetic right shift? – Daniel Fischer Apr 27 '13 at 18:56
    
Conditionally negate the result with int mask = x >> 31; return (result + mask) ^ mask; Not portable, obviously. – harold Apr 27 '13 at 18:58
    
These problems are solely built for an Intel 32bit architecture. We can assume two's complement and arithmetic right shift. – P Dutt Apr 27 '13 at 18:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

harold's suggestion is almost correct, but instead of -result, for negative x, we need

result - (1 << n)

unless result is 0. In two's complement,

x & ((1 << n) - 1)

is congruent to x modulo 2^n for every x (and n small enough for 1 << n to work correctly). That is the representant of x's residue class in the interval [0, 2^n).

The requirement is to get a negative (non-positive, more precisely) remainder (in the interval (-2^n, 0]) for negative x. That means, for negative x that are not multiples of 2^n, we must subtract 2^n from x & ((1 << n) - 1).

int rempwr2(int x, int n)
{
   //Compute x%(2^n) for 0 <= n <= 30.
   //Negative arguments should yield a negative remainder.
   //Examples: rempwr2(15, 2) = 3; rempwr2(-35, 3) = -3;
   //Legal ops: ! ~ ^ | + << >>

   //My attempt at a solution:
   int power = (1 << n) + ~0;  // 2^n - 1
   int mask = x >> 31;
   int result = x & power;
   return (x & power) + (((~((!!result) << n)) + 1) & mask);
}

If x >= 0, then mask = 0, and (x & power) + (whatever & mask) = (x & power) is the correct result.

For x < 0, we must subtract 1 << n, unless result = 0.

(!!result) << n

is 0 if x is a multiple of 2^n, and 2^n otherwise. Since direct subtraction is not permitted, we must negate that (-n = ~n + 1 in two's complement), so we find

(~((!!result) << n)) + 1

is still 0 if result = 0, and -2^n otherwise, hence that is what we must add for negative x. But that can also be a non-zero value for positive x, hence we must nullify it in that case, which we do by taking the bitwise and with mask (which is 0 for x >= 0 and has all bits set for x < 0).

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This seems like we're on the right track, but is still incorrect: When checking, rempwr2(-2147483647, 2), it gave -1 when it should have given -3. – P Dutt Apr 27 '13 at 19:18
    
Oooh, right, that's it. Hang on a moment. – Daniel Fischer Apr 27 '13 at 19:20
    
@PDutt Got it now, I'm pretty sure. – Daniel Fischer Apr 27 '13 at 19:31
    
@harold Yes, you're right. I was irritated by the wrong result, however we don't need -(x & power) for negative x, but (x & power) - (1 << n), unless the remainder is 0. – Daniel Fischer Apr 27 '13 at 19:33
    
It worked! Could you explain the return statement in a little more detail? What was your thought process for coming up with this solution? – P Dutt Apr 27 '13 at 19:34

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