Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my backbone.js application, I'm trying to fade in the view element after it's been appended. However it doesn't work.

Live example here: http://metropolis.pagodabox.com

    var itemRender = view.render().el;

    $('#items-list').append(itemRender);
    $(itemRender).addClass('show'); 

However if I add a small setTimeout function, it works.

    var itemRender = view.render().el;

    $('#items-list').append(itemRender);

    setTimeout(function(){
        $(itemRender).addClass('show'); 
    },10);

Using fadeIn() also works but I prefer to use straight CSS for the transition as it's more efficient, and prefer not to use any setTimeout "hacks" to force it to work. Is there a callback I can use for append? Or any suggestions? The full code is below:

itemRender: function (item) {
    var view = new app.ItemView({ model: item }),
        itemName = item.get('name'),
        itemRender = view.render().el;

    $('#items-list').append(itemRender);
    $(itemRender).addClass('show');

    app.itemExists(itemName);
}

CSS/LESS:

#items-list li {
    padding: 0 10px;
    margin: 0 10px 10px;
    border: 1px solid @black;
    .border-radius(10px);
    position: relative;
    .opacity(0);
    .transition(opacity)
}

#items-list li.show {.opacity(1)}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

This "hack" you mention (or some variant of it) is occasionally necessary for web development, simply due to the nature of how browsers render pages.

(NOTE: This is all from memory, so while the overall idea is right please take any details with a small grain of salt.)

Let's say you do the following:

$('#someElement').css('backgroundColor', 'red');
$('#someElement').css('backgroundColor', 'blue');

You might expect to see the background color of #someElement flash red for a brief moment, then turn blue right? However, that won't happen, because browsers try to optimize rendering performance by only rendering the final state at the end of the JS execution. As a result, the red background will never even appear on the page; all you'll ever see is the blue.

Similarly here, the difference between:

  1. append
  2. set class

and:

  1. append
  2. wait 1ms for the JS execution to finish
  3. set class

Is that the latter allows the element to enter the page and AFTER the JS is executed have its style change, while the former just applies the style change before the element gets shown.

So while in general window.setTimeout should be avoided, when you need to deal with these ... complications of browser rendeering, it's really the only way to go. Personally I like using the Underscore library's defer function:

var itemRender = view.render().el;

$('#items-list').append(itemRender);

_(function(){
    $(itemRender).addClass('show'); 
}).defer();

It's the same darn thing, but because it's encapsulated in a library function it feels less dirty to me :-) (and if the "post-render" logic is more than a line or two I can factor it in to a Backbone View method and do _(this.postRender).defer() inside my render method).

share|improve this answer
    
This was tripping me up for a while, thanks for explaining it so well. –  JayD3e Nov 12 '13 at 21:48

You can use CSS animations

@keyframes show {
  0%   { opacity: 0; }
  100% { opacity: 1; }
}

#items-list li {
    padding: 0 10px;
    margin: 0 10px 10px;
    border: 1px solid @black;
    .border-radius(10px);
    position: relative;
}
#items-list li.show {
    animation: show 1s;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.