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I'm new to PL/SQL and stored procedures in general. I'm trying to write a stored procedure that will be executed from a Java program via a CallableStatement. The procedure takes two parameters, gets the id of the last record, increments it and inserts a new record with the newly incremented id. I found some examples online which are largely doing the same thing, but I can't resolve the errors.

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE insertEmployeeProcedure
(lastname IN VARCHAR, firstname IN VARCHAR) AS
BEGIN
    lastEmpId NUMBER := SELECT COUNT(*) 
    INTO lastEmpId 
    FROM Employees;

    INSERT INTO Employees(id, lname, fname) VALUES(lastEmpId + 1, lastname, firstname);
END insertEmployeeProcedure;
/

The errors are:

Executed successfully in 0.018 s, 0 rows affected.
Line 1, column 1
Error code 984, SQL state 42000: ORA-00984: column not allowed here
Line 8, column 5
Error code 900, SQL state 42000: ORA-00900: invalid SQL statement
Line 9, column 1
Error code 0, SQL state null: java.lang.NullPointerException
Line 9, column 1
Execution finished after 0.018 s, 3 error(s) occurred.

As far as I understand a store procedure is a mix of PL and SQL.That said, I tried incrementing lastEmpId (as lastEmpId := lastEmpId + 1) but got an "Invalid SQL statement" error. Also, Oracle docs (http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/appdev.111/b28843/tdddg_procedures.htm#CIHBCBHC) do not do a good job explaining how to define and use local variables in stored procedures.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
even if ignoring the fact that you are not using a sequence here - it's much better to execute select max(id) from ... and not count(*) because oracle can use min/max scan and obtain the max id with just two (or three) CR from the index. –  haki Apr 28 '13 at 8:34
    
varchar2 is the more common datatype -- Oracle discourages use of varchar. Also object names are case insensitive in Oracle unless you use double-quotes (which most practitioners would not) and the word "procedure" is redundant, so a more conventional name for the procedure would be insert_employee. –  David Aldridge Apr 28 '13 at 17:53

2 Answers 2

You probably want something like

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE insertEmployeeProcedure
(lastname IN VARCHAR, firstname IN VARCHAR) AS 

   lastEmpId NUMBER;
 BEGIN
    SELECT COUNT(*) 
    INTO lastEmpId 
    FROM Employees;

    INSERT INTO Employees(id, lname, fname) VALUES(lastEmpId + 1, lastname, firstname); 
 END insertEmployeeProcedure; 
 /

Note that the variable is declared before BEGIN section.

Also, if you use SQL developer, after you execute package creation code run

 show errors

It will show you any problem before you actually call the procedure.

share|improve this answer
    
Moved the variable in the declare block. Thank you. Still getting "column not allowed here" in the INSERT line. Seems like proper SQL to me. –  Dmitry Apr 27 '13 at 19:20
    
I just tried it and it works fine. Do you have more details? –  Alex Gitelman Apr 27 '13 at 19:27
    
I'm connected to the database and running commands from NetBeans IDE. Will try SQL dev. –  Dmitry Apr 27 '13 at 19:34
    
Downloading SQL dev. Taking awhile. –  Dmitry Apr 27 '13 at 19:39
    
I've tried running the proc from SQL dev and everything does work fine - records are inserted. Must be an IDE issue. Will try to investigate later. Thank you so much for your help!:) –  Dmitry Apr 27 '13 at 20:05

You must use sequences to increment id column. Not always number of rows matches last used id

An example to create sequences:

CREATE SEQUENCE sequence_name
MINVALUE 1
START WITH 1
INCREMENT BY 1
CACHE 20;

An example to use this sequence:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE insertEmployeeProcedure
(lastname IN VARCHAR, firstname IN VARCHAR) AS
BEGIN
   INSERT INTO Employees(id, lname, fname) VALUES(sequence_name.nextval, lastname, firstname);
END insertEmployeeProcedure;
share|improve this answer
    
Tried this. Most errors are gone! The last line is still "invalid SQL" for some strange reason. Thank you. –  Dmitry Apr 27 '13 at 19:32

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