Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

After 1st May Apple is going to reject new apps and updates which are accessing to uniqueIdentifier. They introduced couple new methods in iOS 6.x which is good, but... what if I need my application run on older versions of SDK? So, my code would look like:

if ([UIDevice instancesRespondToSelector:@(identifierForVendor)]) {
     deviceId = [UIDevice currentDevice] identifierForVendor];
} else {
    // WHAT SHOULD BE HERE?
}

What should developers use if it is old SDK? Moreover, even if let's say I find something to use the value would be different once user upgrades his OS version, which is obviously bad - we would have two different ids for the same device.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by H2CO3, Sulthan, wattson12, David Rönnqvist, Tikhon Jelvis Apr 28 '13 at 6:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Well, [[UIDevice currentDevice] uniqueIdentifier], perhaps? –  user529758 Apr 27 '13 at 19:27
    
@H2CO3 Apple will reject them. –  Sulthan Apr 27 '13 at 19:29
    
Did you check stackoverflow.com/questions/6993325/… –  san Apr 27 '13 at 19:30
    
@Sulthan Not if you use it only when/where permitted. That's exactly the purpose of this whole if-statement. –  user529758 Apr 27 '13 at 19:34
2  
@iKiR uniqueIdentifier was deprecated in iOS 5.0 already. The methods to replace it are widely known. You can create your own identifiers and save then to the keychain, for example. See the link @san mentioned above. –  Sulthan Apr 27 '13 at 20:28

1 Answer 1

What should developers use if it is old SDK?

Apple won't accept apps built with an SDK that's more than a few versions old, so you may not have the option of using the SDK that you're thinking of. You can still set the minimum supported iOS version to older versions, but you probably won't be able to use -uniqueIdentifier even when running on pre-6.0 devices.

-[UIDevice uniqueIdentifier] has been deprecated since iOS 5.0, so you've had nearly 2 years to deal with the fact that it's going away. It's too late at this point to try to sneak in another update that uses the UDID; depending on what you do with the UDID you may have a problem. There are several good solutions for replacing the UDID that are within the spirit of the new rules, but again, the window for switching to them seamlessly is more or less closed.

even if let's say I find something to use the value would be different once user upgrades his OS version, which is obviously bad - we would have two different ids for the same device.

Consider the reason that the UDID was deprecated: users don't want you to be able to track their devices without their permission, and Apple surely doesn't want to be seen as enabling you to do it. So, if you do find a solution that works for you and which doesn't use the UDID, you might still risk rejection if your scheme doesn't allow the user to opt out of whatever tracking you're doing.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.