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I have around 1000 files (png) and need to move them into the corresponding directory and their sub-directory.

I do have 26 directories (A - Z) and below each directory the complete alphabet A-Z again. File names are 6 characters/digits long and have a png extension, e.g. e.g. AH2BC0.png

I would need to move the file AH2BC0.png into the directory A and within that directory into the sub-directory H, e.g.A->H->AH2BC0.png.

I have created following script which is not really working as expected:

#!/bin/bash
ls >LISTE.txt
for i in LISTE.txt; do
a=$(cat $i | cut -b 1 | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]')
b=$(cat $i | cut -b 2 | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]')
mkdir -p $a/$b
cat $i | xargs mv $a/$b
rm $i
done

Problem is that a) the sub-directory is not created and b) the files are not moved. Any suggestions or better ideas for the script?

Thanks

PS: I guess it's obvious that it's quite some years ago that I have created any bash scripts or coded so please bear with me. PSS: working on MAC OSX bash 3.2

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's already a post showing a better program to do what you want but I thought I'd show you how to fix yours. Hopefully you'll find it informative.

#!/bin/bash
ls >LISTE.txt
for i in LISTE.txt; do

This loops over the single value LISTE.txt; replace it with:

for i in $(cat LISTE.txt); do

to loop over the contents of the file instead.

    a=$(cat $i | cut -b 1 | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]')
    b=$(cat $i | cut -b 2 | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]')

You want to use echo rather than cat in the above two lines, as you're after the name of the file not its content.

    mkdir -p $a/$b
    cat $i | xargs mv $a/$b

I don't think the above line does what you think it does... It will attempt to rename the $a/$b directory to C, where C is the content of file $i. Replace it with:

    mv $i $a/$b

The following line is not needed:

    rm $i

So simply delete it. It would only be necessary if you copied rather than moved the files using mv.

done

Here's your complete program after the changes I've suggested.

#!/bin/bash
ls >LISTE.txt
for i in $(cat LISTE.txt); do
    a=$(echo $i | cut -b 1 | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]')
    b=$(echo $i | cut -b 2 | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]')
    mkdir -p $a/$b
    mv $i $a/$b
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! It definitely was informativ and I'm shocked how many mistakes I made. –  AtaDas Apr 27 '13 at 21:28
    
If you liked my answer I'd welcome an upvote :-) –  Stig Brautaset Apr 27 '13 at 21:30
1  
would like to upvote but not able to. I do get the message that I would need 15 reputation to be able to. sorry. –  AtaDas Apr 27 '13 at 21:45
    
An upvote is deserved :) –  Srdjan Grubor Apr 27 '13 at 21:49
#!/bin/bash
for item in *; do
    first=${item:0:1}
    second=${item:1:1}

    folder="$first/$second"
    mkdir -p $folder
    mv $item $folder/
done
share|improve this answer
    
also works just with one error. the second directory name does start two digits and not one. nevertheless, also big thanks. –  AtaDas Apr 27 '13 at 21:43
    
Fixed second=${item:1:2} should have been second=${item:1:1} –  Srdjan Grubor Apr 27 '13 at 21:48
    
yep, works. cheers. –  AtaDas Apr 27 '13 at 21:49

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