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I'm writing a VM in C++ for a programming language. The language is garbage collected, so I have instances of C++ classes that are allocated in the garbage collected heap. I'm using a copying collector, so when a GC happens, those objects are moved in memory. This means every pointer to that object needs to be updated. Most of those pointers are easy to handle, except for one tricky one: this. Consider:

class SomeObj : public Managed      // inheriting from this means it's on the GC heap
{
public:
  void method()
  {
    SomeObj* other = new SomeObj(); // could trigger a GC.
    printf("%d\n", someField);      // this points to wrong memory
  }

private:
  int someField;
};

If I am in the middle of an instance method of some object that lives on the GC heap, then this points to some GC memory. A collection can occur in the middle of this method. When that happens, the object gets moved to a new location. But, since we are in the middle of a method call, this is still pointing to the old wrong location.

I could get around this by not using instance methods on classes that are in managed memory, but I do like that the code is simpler this way. Are there any techniques for dealing with this?

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this is just a hidden parameter to method. You can do what you like, say, you can delete this;, provided it was allocated appropriately and you don't access it (directly or indirectly) after that. –  Petr Budnik Apr 27 '13 at 21:13
    
Note that it's not just this you need to worry about, it's any local pointer variable: void SomeObj::method() { int *x = &m_int; do_something_that_causes_GC(); use(x); } (The compiler might put x in a register.) –  RichieHindle Apr 27 '13 at 21:17
    
If you have a binary tree (with 2 pointers per node), what code fixes all the pointers after a GC? I think a copying collector requires introducing another level of indirection. –  brian beuning Apr 27 '13 at 21:37
    
If you know where this is your GC can update it, it's either on the stack or in a register. Is the problem that you don't know where this is? If so then you have more serious problems I think. –  john Apr 27 '13 at 21:39
    
Have you looked at the Boehm conservative garbage collector? It does GC but does not move objects and is widely used. –  brian beuning Apr 27 '13 at 21:48

2 Answers 2

Your GC needs to scan the stack and registers for pointers and fix them. If your VM supports multi-threading, you need to suspend all threads while scanning their stacks. The 'this' pointer will be on the stack or in a register.

Since C++ does not supply type information for the stack you may have a hard time with something like

int i = 1000000;
char * p = new char[10]; // 0xF4240 = 1000000

Whatever method you are using to move other pointers is going to have the same problem. At some point your code must convert handles to pointers and those pointers will need to be fixed.

Change C++ code like this

func()->method()

to look like

struct GCroot call123 = { func() };
call123.obj->method();

Multi-threading issue. If you have code like this

struct GCroot obj123 = { /* .. */ };
obj123.ptr->x = obj123.ptr->x + 1;

it might generate pseudo assembly code like this

load r1, obj123.ptr
load r2, (r1)
add r2, 1
store (r1), r2

if another thread does a GC anytime between the first and last asm lines, how does r1 get fixed?

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Other pointers don't have any problems here. I can wrap them in a structure that makes them visible roots and the GC will be able to find them directly. –  munificent Apr 28 '13 at 14:53
    
@munificent So before calling any C++ method with a this pointer, wrap the this pointer in the same structure. –  brian beuning Apr 28 '13 at 15:31
    
I don't see how to do that given that this's semantics are baked into C++. What am I missing? –  munificent Apr 28 '13 at 18:41
    
@munificent See new code in answer above. –  brian beuning Apr 28 '13 at 19:01
    
I don't believe that will work. Within the body of method, this will still be permanently bound to the original raw pointer to the object. What I could do is not use instance methods, and instead do SomeClass::method(gc<SomeClass> self). But I'd like to avoid that if possible. –  munificent Apr 28 '13 at 19:26

You can introduce another level of indirection. I will use your example:

class SomeData : public Managed
{
 int someField;
};

class SomeObj : public Managed      // inheriting from this means it's on the GC heap
{
public:
  void method()
  {
    SomeObj* other = new SomeObj(); // could trigger a GC.
    printf("%d\n", someData->someField);      // this points to wrong memory
  }

private:
  SomeObjData* someData;
};

Note that every implementation of managed will to do that.

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Doesn't this code have the same problem? The GC moves the current object, this is no longer valid, the access of someData crashes. –  RichieHindle Apr 28 '13 at 6:27

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