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Before you mention it, I can't use the Boost filesystem. :C

So, I'm currently messing around with a program that throws a file into a directory that's generated by a password. Each character in the password represents a folder. I'm at the point where I want to create a function that retrieves the file from the password directory, and destroys the entire directory, but I can't seem to correctly get the filename from the directory using FindFirstFile.

    WIN32_FIND_DATA data;
    HANDLE hFind;
    LPCWSTR LPCfilename;
    string directory = "";

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i<password.length(); i++)
    {
        directory= directory + password[password.length()-i-1]+"\\";
    }
    string filename = "*";
    directory = directory + filename +"\0";

    wstring tempd = wstring(directory.begin(), directory.end());
    LPCWSTR LPCdirectory = tempd.c_str();

    hFind = FindFirstFile(LPCdirectory, &data);
    while(hFind == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        FindNextFile(hFind, &data);
    }
    if(hFind != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        LPCfilename = data.cFilename;

The particular problem seems to be with my last line:

LPCfilename = data.cFilename;

The value that LPCfilename is receiving is translating to only a single character; the "." character. While my file is a .txt with the name "file".

cFilename also seems to contain the value ".", so I'm not quite sure what it could be that's causing me not to receive the correct filename.


Here's the solution I came to given the answers people gave:

//deconstructs the labyrinth and returns file to the root folder
void ReleaseTheBeastBeyondThePortcullis(const string& password)
{
    HANDLE hFind;
    WIN32_FIND_DATAA data = {0};
    string directory = "";
    string filename = "";

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i<password.length(); i++)
    {
        directory= directory + password[password.length()-i-1]+"\\";
    }

    hFind = FindFirstFileA((directory + "*").c_str(), &data);
    if (hFind != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        do
        {
            if ((data.dwFileAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY) == 0)
            {
                directory = directory + data.cFileName;
                filename = data.cFileName;
                break;
            }
        }
        while (FindNextFileA(hFind, &data));
        FindClose(hFind);
    }

    wstring tempd = wstring(directory.begin(), directory.end());
    LPCWSTR LPCdirectory = tempd.c_str();

    wstring tempf = wstring(filename.begin(), filename.end());
    LPCWSTR LPCfilename = tempf.c_str();

    MoveFile(LPCdirectory, LPCfilename);
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As Michael Liu said, you are not taking into account that every directory has hidden . and .. subdirectories. You are doing a wildcard search, so the search results are going to include those subdirectories. You need to ignore them while looping, eg:

string directory;
string fullpathtofile;

for(unsigned int i = 0; I < password.length(); ++i)
{
    directory += (password[password.length()-i-1] + "\\");
}

WIN32_FIND_DATAA data = {0};
HANDLE hFind = FindFirstFileA((directory + "*").c_str(), &data);
if (hFind != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
    do
    {
        if ((data.dwAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY) == 0)
        {
            fullpathtofile = directory + data.cFilename;
            break;
        }
    }
    while (FindNextFile(hFind, &data));
    FindClose(hFind);
}

if (!fullpathtofile.empty())
{
    // use fullpathtofile as needed ...
    // delete directory ...
}

On the other hand, if you already know the complete directory and filename ahead of time, you don't need to loop FindFirstFile() at all. Just search for the complete file path without any wildcards and the search will either succeed or fail, eg:

string directory;

for(unsigned int i = 0; I < password.length(); ++i)
{
    directory += (password[password.length()-i-1] + "\\");
}

string fullpathtofile = directory + "file.txt";

WIN32_FIND_DATAA data = {0};
HANDLE hFind = FindFirstFileA(fullpathtofile.c_str(), &data);
if (hFind != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
    FindClose(hFind);

    // use data if needed...

    // use fullpathtofile as needed ...
    // delete directory ...
}

A wildcard search only makes sense if you DO NOT know the filename ahead of time, or if there are multiple files in the directory.

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly the thing, I don't know the filename. My intention is to simply get whatever file is in that directory, without actually knowing the file's name. –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 21:42
    
And shouldn't the file be in a fixed position in the loop iterations? Or will it be in a different position every time? –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 21:43
    
If the folder always contains just the single file and never anything else, then it should be in the same position every time, but it is best not to rely on that behavior. Let the looped info tell you exactly when a file is actually reached, as shownin my first example. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 28 '13 at 21:47
    
In case I don't remember to say so, thank you so much for the help. On another note, would you happen to also know how to –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 22:16
    
In case I don't remember to say so, thank you so much for the help. two things though, MSDN doesn't seem to have too much info about the inner workings of dwFileAttributes and FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY. What's the purpose of the comparison in the if statement of the do while? What's it doing? And on another note, would you happen to also know how to find the directory that's above my password directory? If I were to use MoveFile(h\n\k\file.txt, file.txt) would that place it in the folder above h? –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 22:22
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Every file system directory contains entries for ".", representing that same directory, and "..", representing the parent directory. In this case, FindFirstFile is returning "." first. You need to keep calling FindNextFile until it finds your .txt file.

Something like this:

hFind = FindFirstFile(LPCdirectory, &data);
if (hFind != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
    do
    {
        if (((data.dwAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY) == 0) &&
            (lstrcmpi(data.cFileName, _T("file.txt")))
        {
            // do something with the file...
            break;
        }
    }
    while (FindNextFile(hFind, &data));
    FindClose(hFind);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The issue I'm having though, is that my intention isn't to find the file given a file name. I was hoping to use the wildcard values to find whatever file exists in the directory, without actually knowing the name of it. Is there a function that's intended for this? –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 21:41
    
FindFirstFile() works just fine for that. You just have to pay attention to what the search results are actually telling you. In the code above, simply remove the lstrcmpi() check. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 28 '13 at 21:48
    
What is it about dwAttributes and FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY that determines whether the filename is valid or not? –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 22:30
    
Remy added that check to ignore subdirectories, because FindFirstFile/FindNextFile return both files and subdirectories. –  Michael Liu Apr 28 '13 at 22:37
    
So 0x00000010 is a 32bit value that basically just represents some file type's attribute of being a subdirectory? –  user1974878 Apr 28 '13 at 22:50
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