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I'm trying to achieve this:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

void log(
        const char* argFile,
                int argLineNb,
                const char* argFunction,
                std::stringstream& argString) {
    std::cout << argFile << ":" << argLineNb << " " << argFunction
        << " " << argString.str()<< std::endl;
}


/**
 * \brief       Macro declarations
 */

#define LOG_TEST(f) \
                log(__FILE__, __LINE__, \
                        __FUNCTION__, (std::ostringstream << f))

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    LOG_TEST("HELLO");
    LOG_TEST("HELLO" << " !");

    return 0;
}

Problem is that I don't really know how to do that as I'm getting the following errors:

invalid initialization of reference of type 'std::stringstream& {aka std::basic_stringstream&}' from expression of type 'std::basic_ostream::__ostream_type {aka std::basic_ostream

I don't know if there's a simpler way to do that with boost...

Here is source: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/view?id=222cbb23ea5162b16378b13a24fceb9e-4f0e144d2529f0880899ab58231ebbe3

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
You're passing a tempval stringstream to a function requiring a non-const reference. All but a few compilers will not let you do that, as it is non-standard. The ones most-known for allowing it are Microsoft's. Almost everyone else will not. –  WhozCraig Apr 28 '13 at 0:58
    
@tacp if you're going to paste code from the OP's link, at least paste it verbatim. The code you posted is not the same as the code on the link provided in the question. His code has a std::stringstream() in the log macro, the code you pasted has std::ostringstream (note the lack of automatic construction). –  WhozCraig Apr 28 '13 at 1:01
    
@WhozCraig I did not paste it, I just changed the format of the code in OP's question. What is the problem? I have not even looked at the link. –  taocp Apr 28 '13 at 1:03
    
@tacp how the heck did that change? Check out the change log. its bizarre. –  WhozCraig Apr 28 '13 at 1:05
    
@WhozCraig how could I look at the log? I am happy to correct if I made any mistake. –  taocp Apr 28 '13 at 1:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The main issue here is this: (std::stringstream() << f)

If you read the reference to std::stringstream's operator<<(...) you'll find that it is inherited from std::ostream

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/ostream/ostream/operator%3C%3C/

The problem is the operator<<(...) returns an std::ostream and therefore, when you pass (std::stringstream() << f) you are actually passing an std::ostream to a function that requires an std::stringstream (hence, the invalid initialization of stringstream from ostream)

To achieve what you want, exactly, you'll have to modify the way your macro works. Try something like this instead:

#define LOG_TEST(f) \
    do { std::stringstream s; \
         s << f; \
         log(__FILE__, __LINE__, __FUNCTION__, s); \
    } while (0)
share|improve this answer
    
Works epicly thanks! –  Syffys Apr 28 '13 at 10:04

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