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I'm having a bit of trouble with a recursive function. I pass an array containing integers into it, an then the function either adds or subtracts them all together. I got the addition function implemented correctly, but I am having a hard time getting the subtraction bit correct.

Here is what I've noticed: size is currently set to 5. To test it I change the if(i == size) line in the subtraction part of the function to if(i == (size - 3)), and it appears to subtract the second element correctly from the first element (4 - 2). But if I let it run again, I get 9, instead of (4-2) - 7 = -5, which I should get. Is it adding a -7, perhaps?

Also, I am really grateful for all pointers, but I also acknowledge that this may not be the most efficient program to accomplish what I'm trying to do. I'm a beginning programmer, and it would help me most to see where I've gone wrong in my current program, as opposed to how I should have done my algorithm instead.

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;


int reduceArray(int array[], int size, char op, int i = 0)
{
    if(op == '+')
    {
        if(size == 0)
        return 0;

        if(i == size)
        return 0;

        else
        { 
            return array[i++] + reduceArray(array, size, '-', i + 1);   
        }
    }

    else if(op == '-')
    {
        if(size == 0)
        return 0;

        if(i == (size - 2)) //changing this to "size - n" changes how many numbers are subtracted
        return 0;

        else
        { 
            return array[i++] - reduceArray(array, size, '-', i + 1);   
        }
    }
}

int main()
{
    int array[] = {4, 2, 7, 1, 9};

    //cout << reduceArray(array, 5, '+') << endl; this bit works fine works fine
    cout << reduceArray(array, 5, '-') << endl;
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

EDIT: Actually--the same thing happens for the division program. For the third element of the array (the 7), it is doing the INVERSE operation--when it should subtract, it adds, when it should divide, it multiplies--can't figure out why this is happening.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are modifying i immediately after you call the function. After the function returns i has been incremented by one. When you retrieve the value from array[i] you are retrieving the wrong element, in essence you are doing array[i + 1] =. You are also accessing element beyond the end of the array.

This code for the operators is doing the calculations from right to left instead of left to right as you expect. You are always calling reduceArray before the calculation is done so it goes all the way to the end of the array then starts backtracking (return) and doing the calculations after each time return. To correct this you need to do the calculations before you call reduceArray then perform another calculation on the result it returns.

if(i < (size - 3)) // This MUST be -1 in order to go to the end of the array!
{
    // We're operating on the current array entry and the next entry.
    // this is why (size - 1) is necessary to prevent accessing beyond
    // the end of the array.
    int result = array[i] - array[i + 1];
    i += 2;
    return result - reduceArray(array, size, '-', i);
}
return array[i];

This returns -5 as the result which is what you are expecting.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense. I edited my code accordingly, but I still actually am getting the same results. It starts out correctly--first I get 4, then it subtracts the 2 and I get 2, but then instead of subtracting the 7 (the next element in the array), it seems like it adds it, because I next get 9 instead of -7. –  user2302335 Apr 28 '13 at 2:12
    
When reduceArray returns a negative number you subtract that from the number in the array. `1 - -5 = 6' so it looks like you are adding a number. –  Captain Obvlious Apr 28 '13 at 2:44
    
How could I remedy this? abs() perhaps? –  user2302335 Apr 28 '13 at 2:54
    
No. I already have a solution. I'm updating my answer now. The calculations are being done in reverse do to the native of the recursive function. I didn't take that into account earlier. –  Captain Obvlious Apr 28 '13 at 3:06
    
I see how you changed it--but if you increment by 2, what happens if an array just one int larger is passed in? Seems closer, but the code is still not quite right. The code should return -15 after going thorough the whole array. –  user2302335 Apr 28 '13 at 15:26

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