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I am debuging a function hashKey. The problem is that it generates different result for the same input under different platforms, windows/win ce, mac os, android. Here is the code:

unsigned long hashKey(const char *name,size_t len)
{
    unsigned long h=(unsigned long)len;
    size_t step = (len>>5)+1;
    for(size_t i=len; i>=step; i-=step)
        h = h ^ ((h<<5)+(h>>2)+(unsigned long)name[i-1]);
    return h;
}

Here is the test program I use:

int main()
{
    char word[] = { 0xE6, 0xBE, 0xB3, 0xE9, 0x96, 0x80, 0xE7, 0x89, 0xB9, 0xE5, 
        0x88, 0xA5, 0xE8, 0xA1, 0x8C, 0xE6, 0x94, 0xBF, 0xE5, 0x8D, 
        0x80, 0x2E, 0x70, 0x6E, 0x67, 0x00};
    // for those who are interested in what the value of variable means, it means
    // "澳門特別行政區.png"

    unsigned int val = hashKey(word, strlen(word));
    printf("hash key for [%s] is [%d].\n", word, (unsigned int)val);
}

The length is 25, the input value is the same, however, the return values are different:

In android, it is 648. In win ce, it is 96, which is the expected value.

I couldn't figure out why. Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance!

More information:

  1. the different value begins after several interations in the loop, caused by h>>2. So in the beginning, the values are the same.

  2. it seems input of ansi characters don't have such issue.

Solved (Thanks to Yojimbo's advice) on May 3, 2013.

unsigned long hashKey(const char *name,size_t len)
{
    unsigned long h=(unsigned long)len;
    size_t step = (len>>5)+1;
    for(size_t i=len; i>=step; i-=step)
    {
        unsigned long charVal = (unsigned long)name[i-1];
        if (charVal >= 0x00000080)
            charVal = charVal | 0xffffff80;
        h = h ^ ((h<<5 & 0xffffffe0)+(h>>2 & 0x3fffffff) + charVal);
    }
    return h;
}
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe some of the compilers treat "char" as signed, and others don't? Try changing

h = h ^ ((h<<5)+(h>>2)+(unsigned long)name[i-1]);

to

h = h ^ ((h<<5)+(h>>2)+(unsigned long)(name[i-1] & 0xff));

Also, bitwise right shift (your h>>2) may extend the sign bit or not, depending on the whims of the compiler and the machine instruction set.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, you are right, h>>2 indeed generates different results. But even if I changed to h/4, the results are still different... –  Hunter Apr 28 '13 at 3:03
    
any solutions to deal with it? –  Hunter Apr 28 '13 at 3:31
    
This code could fail for almost any of the reasons mentioned on this page. It would be better to choose a less machine and compiler-dependent algorithm. That being said, see if the compilers that you are using support the unsigned shift operator >>>. If they do, then h>>>2 should not sign-extend. If that operator is not available, then you may have to rely on bit masking using the bitwise-and operator &. E.g., if x is a 32-bit integer, then (x & 0x7fffffff) is the value of x with the high bit cleared. (x & 0x3fffffff) clears the two highest bits. –  Yojimbo Apr 29 '13 at 11:22
    
That works! It finally solved my problem. Thanks Yojimbo. To generate the correct result, I need to force x | 0xffffff80 when the x(char value) is larger than 0x0000007f so that the result is same as the result under windows. –  Hunter May 3 '13 at 1:53
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You're using bitwise shift operators. Are you certain the byte ordering is the same on the processors in question? x86 uses little endian, ARM can be big or little endian.

Also, the size of an int and long can differ. The only rule in C++ is that char <=short <=int <=long <= long long. The exact size isn't defined and can change. A 64 bit processor will have bigger ints and longs than a 32 normally.

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what is interesting is that the different value begins after several interations in the loop, caused by h>>2. So in the beginning, the values are the same. What's more, it seems input of ansi characters don't have such issue. –  Hunter Apr 28 '13 at 2:52
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You are assuming the size of ints and longs are fixed, but they are not: they vary wildly by platform. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_integer#Long_integer

I got a big negative number when I ran that code on a 64bit box. Try including stdint.h and use explicitly sized types like "uint32_t" everywhere that it matters. (I.e. a loop that iterates over your array can be "int", but bit manipulation should be a fixed-size type.)

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I am sorry to find out that the IDE I use -- vs 2005 -- don't support uint32_t...It is not new enough. –  Hunter Apr 28 '13 at 2:50
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