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I want to make the following class to work with int, double and other additive types without run-time overhead on boxing/unboxing, but with possibility to reuse from another generic type:

public class agg<T>{
    public static T add(T a,T b){return a+b;} // compile error: Operator '+' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'
    public static T add(T a,T b){return (dynamic)a+b;} // compiles, but involves boxing and unboxing at run-time
}

How can I achieve that ?

If I define method for each type explicitly, I can't use that class from another generic type test<T> without defining methods for each type explicitly in that class too:

public class agg<T>{
    //public static T add(T a,T b){return a+b;} // compile error: Operator '+' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'
    //public static T add(T a,T b){return (dynamic)a+b;} // compiles, but involves boxing and unboxing at run-time
    public static int add(int a,int b){return a+b;} // won't be matched by test agg<T>.add(a,b) invokation
}
public class test<T>{
    public test(T a,T b){
        var c=agg<T>.add(a,b); //compile error: The best overloaded method match for 'agg<T>.add(int, int)' has some invalid arguments
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why generics if it is just double and it? You could have two Add methods. double Add(double a, double b), and int Add(int a, int b). –  Dilshod Apr 28 '13 at 3:42
1  
Check out stackoverflow.com/questions/147646/… which discusses exactly this problem with operators. –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 28 '13 at 3:45
    
@Alexei: I see 4 things there: 1) reference to downloadable source code, 2) dynamic, 3) ICalc, 4) IL. #2 and #3 are not very good, #4 is interesting if it works, but I wondered more about pure C# solution. #1 - downloadable source code does a lot of things, I would like to have some simple example. –  alpav Apr 28 '13 at 4:08

2 Answers 2

I don't think you'll find a good way to do what you're trying to do. Some possibilities:

  1. Use dynamic the way you show.
  2. Have an if/else chain, or switch on full type name, to identify a list of known types as being equal to T (e.g. if (typeof(T) == typeof(int)) add((int)a,(int)b); etc.)
  3. Instead of using new test<int>, create a testInt : test<int> class that calls the correct method.
  4. Call the add methods using dynamic casting in test<T>, not in agg<T>.

Example of 3:

public static class agg{
    public static int add(int a,int b){return a+b;}
    public static byte add(byte a,byte b){return (byte)(a+b);}
    public static decimal add(decimal a,decimal b){return a+b;}
    // etc
}
public class testInt:test<int>
{
    public testInt(int a, int b) : base(a, b) { }
    protected override int add(int a, int b)
    {
        return agg.add(a, b);
    }
}
public abstract class test<T>{
    public test(T a,T b){
        T c = add(a, b);
    }
    protected abstract T add(T a, T b);
}

Example of 4:

public class test<T>{
    public test(T a,T b){
        T c = agg.add((dynamic)a, (dynamic)b);
    }
}

Why are you concerned with boxing/unboxing? Is this a highly performance-sensitive task? If so, anything involving dynamic is likely to be unfeasible. If you're not sure that this code needs to run as fast as possible, don't prematurely optimize: forget about performance for now and solve the problem in the best, most readable way you can.

share|improve this answer
    
I found better way than those 4 mentioned by you (see my answer) that does not involve casting, defining separate classes for each template type, or if statements for each type. –  alpav Apr 28 '13 at 6:07
1  
In certain application areas (e.g. embedded system drivers), things may be run within a tight loop every 10ms or so, and so the boxing objects do add up rapidly. In my case, I once removed a substring operation and manipulate it char-by-char, and the program's runtime memory consumption dropped by 70% and CPU by half. But of course, that function runs once every 10ms. –  Stephen Chung Apr 22 at 3:28
    
But I agree with you: don't prematurely optimize. –  Stephen Chung Apr 22 at 3:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

My solution using pure C# (no IL or 3rd party libraries):

internal class agginit{internal static bool started=false;}
public class agg<T>{
    //public static T add(T a,T b){return a+b;} // compile error: Operator '+' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'
    //public static T add(T a,T b){return (dynamic)a+b;} // compiles, but involves boxing and unboxing at run-time
    //public static int add(int a,int b){return a+b;} // won't be matched by test agg<T>.add(a,b) invokation
    public static T add(T a,T b){return _add(a,b);}
    static Func<T,T,T> _add=null;
    public static void setAdd(Func<T,T,T> f){if(_add==null)_add=f;else throw new Exception("Can't init twice");}
    static agg(){
        if(!agginit.started){ // to prevent recursive actions
            agginit.started=true;
            agg<int>._add=(a,b)=>a+b;
            agg<double>._add=(a,b)=>a+b;
            // below we initialize all other potentially used additive types just for fun, if type is not listed here, it's not supported
            agg<string>._add=(a,b)=>a+b;
            agg<byte>._add=(a,b)=>{return (byte)(a+b);}; // dirty down-cast, needs to be enhanced with return type generic parameter
            agg<long>._add=(a,b)=>a+b;
            agg<System.Numerics.BigInteger>._add=(a,b)=>a+b;
            agg<StringBuilder>._add=(a,b)=>{var ret=new StringBuilder();ret.Append(a.ToString());ret.Append(b.ToString());return ret;};
            agg<IEnumerable<T>>._add=(a,b)=>a.Concat(b);
            agg<HashSet<T>>._add=(a,b)=>{var ret=new HashSet<T>(a);ret.UnionWith(b);return ret;};
            agg<SortedSet<T>>._add=(a,b)=>{var ret=new SortedSet<T>(a);ret.UnionWith(b);return ret;};
            agg<byte[]>._add=(a,b)=>{var ret=new byte[a.Length+b.Length];Buffer.BlockCopy(a,0,ret,0,a.Length);Buffer.BlockCopy(b,0,ret,a.Length,b.Length); return ret;};
            agg<System.IO.MemoryStream>._add=(a,b)=>{var ret=new System.IO.MemoryStream(new byte[a.Length+b.Length]);a.WriteTo(ret);b.WriteTo(ret);return ret;};
        }
    }
}
public class test<T>{
    public T res;
    public test(T a,T b){
        res=agg<T>.add(a,b);
    }
}
public class A{
    public int z;
    static A(){
        agg<A>.setAdd((a,b)=>new A{z=a.z+b.z}); // any class can define own add implementation
    }
    public void test(){
        var t1=agg<A>.add(new A{z=1},new A{z=2});
        if(t1.z!=3)throw new Exception("test failed");
        var t2=new test<A>(new A{z=1},new A{z=2});
        if(t2.res.z!=3)throw new Exception("test failed");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hm, interesting approach. I like it. However, your Func<T,T,T> can simply be a property, instead of explicit getter (add) and setter (setAdd) methods. This has the benefit of allowing other code to see whether their add is null or not before trying to set it. In both cases, it's used the same simple way: agg<T>.add(a, b). Here's that property: public static Func<T,T,T> add { get { return _add; } set { if(_add==null)_add=value;else throw new Exception("Can't init twice"); } } –  Tim S. Apr 28 '13 at 13:21
    
@Tim: I agree, I added setAdd quickly just to demo that classes can register themselves to be additive without thinking a lot about design of it, so as classes test and A, naming, structure, e.t.c. –  alpav Apr 28 '13 at 15:14
1  
Excellent solution. Just what I needed to implement type casting functionality to/from generic types. Glad that I find a gem like this. There are many questions on SO regarding how to cast a concrete type to a generic type and back, but no good solution that avoids boxing. This solution solves it nicely. Basically change add to CastTo and the lambdas become x => x. –  Stephen Chung Apr 22 at 3:22

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