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With the following code, when variable "a" and "a1" are equal to 2, I would like the recursive subroutine to create 2 nested do loops of length 4 (maxdev=4). I am attempting to control the level of nesting by the variable "count" (count1 in the subroutine). However, when the subroutine is called by itself, the value for "count1" is not preserved within the first call. I would like the outer loop to retain a value for count1 of 1 and the second loop to have a value for count1 of 2, to reflect the level of nesting. I am unsure how to specify the program so this is achieved. Instead, when the call that creates the inner loop returns to the outer loop, the value of count1 in the outer loop has been changed and reflects what it incremented to be in the inner loop.

program fragarrays
implicit none

integer::gridres,maxdev,a,count
integer, allocatable:: x(:)

open(unit=1,file='D:/output11.txt',status='unknown')

gridres=2

maxdev=gridres*gridres

do a = 1,2 
    count=0    
    allocate(x(a))
    call assigncell(a,maxdev,count,x)
    deallocate(x)
end do

contains

recursive subroutine assigncell(a1,maxdev1,count1,x1)
    integer:: a1,maxdev1,b
    integer::count1
    integer,dimension(a1):: x1

    count1=count1+1
    do b=1,maxdev1
        x1(count1)=b
        write (1,*)count1,x1(count1),b,a1
        if(count1.lt.a1)then
            call assigncell (a1,maxdev1,count1,x1)
        end if

    end do

end subroutine assigncell

end program fragarrays
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make count1 a local variable instead of an argument. Its changing because its implicitly an inout argument and the call is supposed to change it. As a local variable, it is unique to each invocation of the subroutine. For example:

module MyMod
contains
recursive subroutine assigncell(a1,maxdev1,count1_arg,x1)
    integer, intent (in):: a1,maxdev1
    integer, intent (in)::count1_arg
    integer,dimension(a1):: x1
    integer :: count1, b

    count1 = count1_arg
    write (*, *) "entering subr. with", a1, count1
    count1=count1+1
    write (*, *) "changed to: a1, count1=", a1, count1
    do b=1,maxdev1
        x1(count1)=b
        write (1,*)count1,x1(count1),b,a1
        if(count1.lt.a1)then
            call assigncell (a1,maxdev1,count1,x1)
        end if

    end do
    write (*, *) "still at: a1, count1:", a1, count1

end subroutine assigncell

end module MyMod

program fragarrays
use MyMod
implicit none

integer::gridres,maxdev,a,count
integer, allocatable:: x(:)

open(unit=1,file='output11.txt',status='replace')

gridres=2

maxdev=gridres*gridres

do a = 1,2
    count=0
    allocate(x(a))
    write (*, *) "calling with", a, count
    call assigncell(a,maxdev,count,x)
    deallocate(x)
end do


end program fragarrays

P.S. An alternative method of making the count1 argument local to the subroutine: give that argument the VALUE attribute:

...
recursive subroutine assigncell(a1,maxdev1,count1,x1)
    integer, intent (in):: a1,maxdev1
    integer, VALUE ::count1
    integer,dimension(a1):: x1
    integer :: b

    write (*, *) "entering subr. with", a1, count1
...
share|improve this answer
    
This works exactly as needed. Thanks! I was playing around with intent, but am a novice with recursion in fortran and kept getting errors. –  Seth Myers Apr 28 '13 at 4:00
    
I upvoted and clicked the check mark. Anything else I can do to help M.S.B.'s score, rep, etc.? –  Seth Myers Apr 28 '13 at 4:02

I think (I haven't done Fortran for 27 years) that Fortran passes parameters by reference and not by value.

What you need is for each recursive invocation to have it's own set of variables and wind back out as you recurs in and back out.

This GNU Fortran Doc states

8.11.1 The %VAL() Construct

%VAL(arg)

The %VAL() construct specifies that an argument, arg, is to be passed by value, instead of by reference or descriptor.

I note that is says this is really for externally defined functions, to cater for there those that are written in languages that pass by value by default. But I think for you your functions you need to be doing this.

CALL assigncell (%VAL(first_var), %VAL(second_var), ... %VAL(last_var))       

Again I've not not Fortran past F77 so my research and thinking could be way off the mark.

share|improve this answer
    
Fortran 90 has recursive procedures, as used in the question. It isn't necessary to use an extension to the language to achieve recursion. –  M. S. B. Apr 28 '13 at 3:46
    
so I was right but not in the correct way for Fortran 90? Cool. –  Preet Sangha Apr 28 '13 at 7:31
    
No, this was never been true. The only parameter passing mechanism endorsed by Real Programmers is call-by-value-return, as implemented in the IBM/370 Fortran G and H compilers. pbm.com/~lindahl/real.programmers.html –  Vladimir F Apr 28 '13 at 8:11
    
Real Programmers? I wonder if I count? I mean I used to do 370 assembler but again that was 30 years ago and we did it without a stack and a compiler :-) Nice Article - thanks for link. I'll have to find my old copy of the 370 POps –  Preet Sangha Apr 28 '13 at 10:35

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