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I'm having an issue getting this sql query to work properly.

I have the following query

SELECT apps.*, 
SUM(IF(adtracking.appId = apps.id AND adtracking.id = transactions.adTrackingId, transactions.payoutAmount, 0)) AS 'revenue', 
SUM(IF(adtracking.appId = apps.id AND adtracking.type = 'impression', 1, 0)) AS 'impressions'
FROM apps, adtracking, transactions 
WHERE apps.userId = '$userId' 
GROUP BY apps.id

Everything is working, HOWEVER for the 'impressions' column I am generating in the query, I am getting a WAY larger number than there should be. For example, one matching app for this query should only have 72 for 'Impressions' yet it is coming up with a value of over 3,000 when there aren't even that many rows in the adtracking table. Why is this? What is wrong here?

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You are using group by incorrectly. Every other DBMS would reject your query. See here for details: rpbouman.blogspot.de/2007/05/debunking-group-by-myths.html –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 28 '13 at 5:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is you have no join conditions, so you are getting every row of every table being joined in your query result - called a cartesian product.

To fix, change your FROM clause to this:

FROM apps a
LEFT JOIN adtracking ad ON ad.appId = a.id
LEFT JOIN transactions t ON t.adTrackingId = ad.id

You haven't provided the schema for your tables, so I guessed the names of the relevant columns - you may have to adjust them. Also, your transaction table may join to adtracking - it's impossible to know from your question, so agin you have have to alter things slightly. Hopefully you get the idea.

Edit:

Note: your group-by clause is incorrect. You either need to list every column of apps (not recommended), or change your select to only select the id column from apps (recommended). Change your select to this:

SELECT apps.id,
-- rest of query the same

Otherwise you'll get weird, incorrect, results.

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Attached is the schema for each table. table: apps (id) table: adtracking (id, type, appId) table: transactions (id, adTrackingId) –  Braydon Batungbacal Apr 28 '13 at 3:57
    
This is what I've come up with and it seems to work. "SELECT apps.*, SUM(IF(adtracking.appId = apps.id AND adtracking.id = transactions.adTrackingId, transactions.payoutAmount, 0)) AS 'revenue', SUM(IF(adtracking.appId = apps.id AND adtracking.type = 'impression', 1, 0)) AS 'impressions' FROM apps LEFT JOIN adtracking ON adtracking.appId = apps.id LEFT JOIN transactions ON transactions.adTrackingId = adtracking.id WHERE apps.userId = '$userId' GROUP BY apps.id" –  Braydon Batungbacal Apr 28 '13 at 4:01
    
He is also incorrectly using group by which also will give unpredictable results. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 28 '13 at 5:59
    
No. It does not "work correctly", it simply picks random rows. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 28 '13 at 7:53
    
@a_horse_with_no_name yeah, you're right. Dunno what I was thinking... :/. Edited answer. –  Bohemian Apr 28 '13 at 7:55

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