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I was under the impression that || and or were synonymous.

Setting variable with or does not hold value; why?

>> test = nil or true
=> true
>> test
=> nil

>> test = false or true
=> true
>> test
=> false

Works 'as expected' with ||

>> test = nil || true
=> true
>> test
=> true
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This used to be a gotcha for me. –  Andrew Grimm Oct 27 '09 at 2:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

or has lower precedence than =.

test = nil or true

is the same as

(test = nil) or true

which is true, while setting test to nil.

|| has higher precedence than =.

test = nil || true

is the same as

test = (nil || true)

which is true, while setting test to true.

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1  
...which is why we wouldn't write a piece of code like this, or if we did, we would always use brackets to make it clear what's going on. –  Mark Oct 26 '09 at 17:07
    
Thank you, this makes perfect sense. –  Corban Brook Oct 26 '09 at 17:09
2  
Not only does || have a very high and or a very low precedence, but also and and or have the same precedence, whereas || and && have different precedences. In general, in conditional expressions, always use the operator forms, because they have the relative precedences that you actually expect them to have. Use and and or only for control flow, where you actually want the "inside" expressions to bind tighter. Something like test = blah.get_records or puts 'No records found.'. –  Jörg W Mittag Oct 29 '09 at 13:34

Same between and and &&. I was once bited by this gotcha, then I realize that although and is more readable than &&, that does not mean it always more suitable.

>> f = true && false
=> false
>> f
=> false
>> f = true and false
=> false
>> f
=> true
>>
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