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I know it I am just missing something stupid but I am so frustrated I just can't see it. When I run the below code against a file with 3 fields in it "field1;field2;field3" the tasks are printed out correctly in the retrieveTasks method. When the method returns back to main the output is corrupted. I know it is stupid and I am just missing it. I have tried changing CourseName, TaskDescription, etc to arrays instead of char*. I have tried passing fileString in as a char*, I have tried with strcpy and without. Can anyone point me in a direction?

const int MAX_STRING_LENGTH = 101;
const int MAX_TASK_ITEMS = 255;
const char NEWLINE = '\n';
const char DELIMETER[] = ";";
const char FILENAME[] = "tasks.txt";

struct Task {
  char* CourseName;
  char* TaskDescription;
  char* DueDate;
  char FileString[300];

  void printTask() {
    cout << CourseName << DELIMETER << TaskDescription << DELIMETER  << DueDate << endl;
  }

  void initializeFromFileString(char fileString[]) {
    strcpy(FileString, fileString);
    CourseName = strtok(FileString, DELIMETER);
    TaskDescription = strtok(NULL, DELIMETER);
    DueDate = strtok(NULL, DELIMETER);
  }
};

struct TaskList {
  Task Tasks[MAX_TASK_ITEMS];
  int TaskCount;

  void initialize() {
    TaskCount = 0;

    return;
  }

  void addTask(Task task) {
    Tasks[TaskCount] = task;
    TaskCount++;

    return;
  }

  void printTasks() {
    for(int TaskNum = 0; TaskNum < TaskCount; TaskNum++) {
      cout << TaskNum + 1 << ".      ";
      Tasks[TaskNum].printTask();
      cout << endl;
    }

    return;
  }

  // Load data from the file. Will return -1 if it fails for any reason.
  // Otherwise it returns the number of records read.
  int retrieveTasks(const char* fileName) {
    int isSuccessfulOpen = 0;
    int recordsRead = 0;
    ifstream inFile;

    isSuccessfulOpen = openFile(inFile, fileName);

    if(!isSuccessfulOpen) {
      return -1;
    }

    // Read input file and store in appropriate arrays
    while(inFile.eof() == false) {
      char fileLine[MAX_STRING_LENGTH * 3];
      Task task;

      inFile.getline(fileLine, MAX_STRING_LENGTH * 3, NEWLINE);
      inFile.ignore(UINT_MAX, NEWLINE);
      task.initializeFromFileString(fileLine);
      addTask(task);
      recordsRead++;
    }
    inFile.close();

    return recordsRead;
  }
};

int main() {
  bool isFinished = false;
  TaskList taskList;

  taskList.initialize();
  taskList.retrieveTasks(FILENAME);
  taskList.printTasks();

  return 0;
}



int openFile(ifstream& inFile, const char* fileName) {
  inFile.open(fileName);

  // Veryify that the file is valid. If not print error message.
  if(inFile.is_open() == false) {
    cout << "File " << fileName << " does not exist. Please provide a valid file path." << endl;
    return 0;
  }

  return 1;
}

// Open file for writing
int openFile(ofstream& outFile, const char* fileName) {
  outFile.open(fileName);

  // Veryify that the file is valid. If not print error message and exit.
  if(outFile.is_open() == false)
  {
    cout << "File " << fileName << " does not exist. Please provide a valid file path." << endl;
    return 0;
  }

  return 1;
}
share|improve this question
    
Why are you using C strings and libraries ? – Paul R Apr 28 '13 at 6:20
    
Indeed. Using C++ techniques would save you from the Rule of Three/Five problems you have going on, not to mention make the code cleaner and easier to follow. – chris Apr 28 '13 at 6:23
    
I concur. Your local buffer makes the copy-ctor and assignment operator fairly trivial, but honestly this should be done with std::string objects and a standard collection class like std::vector<> for your task list. It would make the code much cleaner. – WhozCraig Apr 28 '13 at 6:31
    
Unfortunately this is an assignment for school and the requirements are that we use cstrings. – user2328414 Apr 28 '13 at 6:52
up vote 4 down vote accepted

CourseName, TaskDescription, DueDate all point to memory in the array existing in the task object created inside the while loop. Since this task object is local scope, they contain garbage once retrieveTasks has finished executing.

Changes needed

  1. Your TaskCount always holds one more than the count - hence this needs to be reduced by 1.

    for(int TaskNum = 0; TaskNum < TaskCount; TaskNum++) {
    

    changed to

    for(int TaskNum = 0; TaskNum < TaskCount -1 ; TaskNum++) {
    
  2. Removed Task object from the while loop.

  3. AddTask takes a char * instead of Task. AddTask calls initializeFromFileString so that the strcpy is done to the string inside the Task object of the array. And strtok is also called on this string

  4. Change

    while(inFile.eof() == false) {
    

    to

    while(inFile) {
    
  5. Removed

    inFile.ignore(UINT_MAX, NEWLINE);
    

Fixed Code

struct Task {
  char* CourseName;
  char* TaskDescription;
  char* DueDate;
  char FileString[300];

  void printTask() {
    cout << CourseName << DELIMETER << TaskDescription << DELIMETER  << DueDate << endl;
  }

  void initializeFromFileString(char fileString[]) {
    strcpy(FileString, fileString);
    CourseName = strtok(FileString, DELIMETER);
    TaskDescription = strtok(NULL, DELIMETER);
    DueDate = strtok(NULL, DELIMETER);
  }

};



int openFile(ifstream& inFile, const char* fileName) {
  inFile.open(fileName);

  // Veryify that the file is valid. If not print error message.
  if(inFile.is_open() == false) {
    cout << "File " << fileName << " does not exist. Please provide a valid file path." << endl;
    return 0;
  }

  return 1;
}

// Open file for writing
int openFile(ofstream& outFile, const char* fileName) {
  outFile.open(fileName);

  // Veryify that the file is valid. If not print error message and exit.
  if(outFile.is_open() == false)
  {
    cout << "File " << fileName << " does not exist. Please provide a valid file path." << endl;
    return 0;
  }

  return 1;
}

struct TaskList {
  Task Tasks[MAX_TASK_ITEMS];
  int TaskCount;

  void initialize() {
    TaskCount = 0;

    return;
  }

  void addTask(char * t) {
    Tasks[TaskCount].initializeFromFileString(t);
    TaskCount++;

    return;
  }

  void printTasks() {
    for(int TaskNum = 0; TaskNum < TaskCount - 1; TaskNum++) {
      cout << TaskNum + 1 << ".      ";
      Tasks[TaskNum].printTask();
      cout << endl;
    }

    return;
  }

  // Load data from the file. Will return -1 if it fails for any reason.
  // Otherwise it returns the number of records read.
  int retrieveTasks(const char* fileName) {
    int isSuccessfulOpen = 0;
    int recordsRead = 0;
    ifstream inFile;

    isSuccessfulOpen = openFile(inFile, fileName);

    if(!isSuccessfulOpen) {
      return -1;
    }

    // Read input file and store in appropriate arrays
    while(inFile) {
      char fileLine[MAX_STRING_LENGTH * 3];

      inFile.getline(fileLine, MAX_STRING_LENGTH * 3, NEWLINE);

      addTask(fileLine);
        printTasks();

      recordsRead++;
    }
    inFile.close();

    return recordsRead;
  }
};

Quite obviously, this whole program would be much simpler and less error prone if you wrote it in C++ instead of writing it in C inside classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. This was a huge help. It would be nice if I could use C++ classes, last term we were able to, but the requirements for this term only allow cstrings. Thanks again for all your help. – user2328414 Apr 28 '13 at 7:01

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