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I'm trying to sort a two-dimensional array vector<vector<int> > a(M,vector<int>(N)) row-wise with respect to its n-th column like this:

sort(a.begin(),a.end(),
  (bind(&vector<int>::operator[],_1,n) >
   bind(&vector<int>::operator[],_2,n)));

however my compiler tells me

error: no matching function for call to ‘bind(<unresolved overloaded function type>, const boost::lambda::placeholder1_type&, int)’
error: no matching function for call to ‘bind(<unresolved overloaded function type>, const boost::lambda::placeholder2_type&, int)’

how should I resolve the call?

PS.: tried an even simpler version of the preceding access to operator[]

  vector<int> a(10);
  (bind(&vector<int>::operator[],_1,_2))(a,2);

which is an adapted copy-cut-and-paste directly from Karlsson's book. Getting

error: no matching function for call to ‘bind(<unresolved overloaded function type>, const boost::lambda::placeholder1_type&, const boost::lambda::placeholder2_type&)’

also for that...

share|improve this question
    
Maybe, you or somebody else gets sort(a.begin(),a.end(),_1[n]>_2[n]); to work using Boost.Lambda. I did not for some reason. –  sellibitze Apr 28 '13 at 8:42

3 Answers 3

With Boost.Phoenix you can use what @sellibitze mentions in the comments:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#include <boost/phoenix.hpp>

namespace phx=boost::phoenix;

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::vector<int>> matrix
    {
        {1, 2, 3, 4},
        {4, 3, 4, 1},
        {9, 1, 0, 2},
        {3, 1, 5, 1}
    };

    const auto N = 2;

    using phx::arg_names::_1;
    using phx::arg_names::_2;

    std::sort( matrix.begin(), matrix.end(), _1[N] > _2[N] );

    for(const auto& row: matrix)
    {
        for(const auto& elem: row)
            std::cout << elem << ' ';

        std::cout << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice use of the Phoenix library –  Sam Miller Apr 28 '13 at 16:56

As @soon said, &std::vector<int>::operator[] refers to an overload set. But you can't pass such a thing to a function template and expect it to deduce its type because its type depends on which overload you meant. So, somewhere you would have to disambiguate it manually.

If you can make use of C++11 features, you should be writing

std::sort(a.begin(),a.end(),
    [=](vector<int> const& a, vector<int> const& b) {
        return a[n] > b[n];
    } );

to get rid of the overloading issue. Here, the const overload would be used simply because a and b refer to const vectors.

If you want it to be C++98 compatible another alternative is to write your own functor for applying the subscript operator:

template<class ResultType>
struct apply_subscript {
    typedef ResultType result_type;
    template<class T, class U>
    ResultType operator()(T const& x, U const& y) const { return x[y]; }
    template<class T, class U>
    ResultType operator()(T      & x, U const& y) const { return x[y]; }
};

:::

using namespace boost;
sort(mat.begin(),mat.end(),
    bind(apply_subscript<int>(),_1,n) >
    bind(apply_subscript<int>(),_2,n)
);

HTH

share|improve this answer

std::vector has const and non-const versions of operator[], and compiler can't deduce, which overloading should be used. You could do something like this:

template <class R, class T, class... Args>
auto const_mem_fn(R (T::* pm)(Args...) const)
    -> decltype(std::mem_fn(pm))
{
    return std::mem_fn(pm);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::vector<int>> matrix
    {
        {1, 2, 3, 4},
        {4, 3, 4, 1},
        {9, 1, 0, 2},
        {3, 1, 5, 1}
    };

    const auto N = 2;

    std::sort
    (
        matrix.begin(), matrix.end(),
        boost::bind(const_mem_fn(&std::vector<int>::operator[]), _1, N) >
        boost::bind(const_mem_fn(&std::vector<int>::operator[]), _2, N)
    );

    for(const auto& row: matrix)
    {
        for(const auto& elem: row)
            std::cout << elem << ' ';

        std::cout << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Or, without const_mem_fn:

const int& (std::vector<int>::*op_sq_br)(std::size_t) const = &std::vector<int>::operator[];

std::sort
(
    matrix.begin(), matrix.end(),
    boost::bind(op_sq_br, _1, N) >
    boost::bind(op_sq_br, _2, N)
);

Output:

3 1 5 1
4 3 4 1
1 2 3 4
9 1 0 2

share|improve this answer
    
why do I need to do (const int& (std::vector<int>::*op_sq_br)(std::size_t) const)? –  Mark Apr 28 '13 at 8:23
    
@Mark, As I already said, compiler can't deduce, which overloading should be used: const version or non-const. In this line we create a pointer, that points to const version. –  soon Apr 28 '13 at 8:25
    
sorry, wasn't finished commenting. I like your 2nd solution, but now I'm having elementary c++ problems: I don't understand in which namspace the function op_sq_br resides. I (wrongly) read it to be within std::vector<int>. But from your usage of bind, it seems this is not the case. Speaking differently why would (const int& (*op_sq_br)(std::size_t) const) == &std::vector<int>::operator[]; not be sufficient/correct for your way of using bind? –  Mark Apr 28 '13 at 8:39
    
@Mark, you can't just write (*op_sq_br), since operator[] is a class member function. Look this for best understanding. –  soon Apr 28 '13 at 8:48
    
@Mark, &std::vector<int>::operator[] refers to an overload set. If you pass this to a function template like bind which accepts almost anything, there is not enough information on how to resolve the ambiguity between the two overloads. But in soon's second solution, this ambiguity is resolved by the type of op_sq_br. op_sq_br can only refer to one of the two operators due to its type. –  sellibitze Apr 28 '13 at 8:50

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