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I have a batch script that looks like this

@ echo off c:/cygwin/bin/bash -li each_sec_extract.bash c:/iperfprocess/sprint/file1.txt > c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/file1.txt each_sec_extract.bash c:/iperfprocess/sprint/file2.txt > c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/file2.txt

When i run this as is, the CYGWIN bash terminal pops up and I can observe the script producing the output I want on the screen, however, when I go to the directory where the file should be located (c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/), I am greeted by an empty text file. When i enter instructions from the CMD line manually, I receive the same result. However, when I run the instruction directly from CYGWIN, it works flawlessly. The part that frustrates me the most, this script used to work fine, then I started getting SED: permission denied errors which forced me to run bash.exe in administrative mode.

Any ideas about what might be happening or what a solution may be? Thank you in advance for any and all help provided.

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Your script has no line breaks. –  foxidrive Apr 28 '13 at 9:25
    
there is a line break between @ echo off and c:/cygwin/bin/bash -li each_sec_extract.bash c:/iperfprocess/sprint/file1.txt > c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/file1.txt each_sec_extract.bash c:/iperfprocess/sprint/file2.txt > c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/file2.txt –  Donald Willis Apr 29 '13 at 1:44
    
It's not legitimate batch syntax. Redirection into multiple files in one command isn't possible like that when using the same STDOUT stream. –  foxidrive Apr 29 '13 at 10:49

2 Answers 2

Is this any different?

@echo off
c:/cygwin/bin/bash -li each_sec_extract.bash c:/iperfprocess/sprint/file1.txt > c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/file1.txt 
c:/cygwin/bin/bash -li each_sec_extract.bash c:/iperfprocess/sprint/file2.txt > c:/iperfprocess/sprintbashed/file2.txt
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Basically it is the same, the reason I dont write it like that is because of a "SED: permission denied error" that requires me to run bash.exe in administrative mode to bypass the error; I'm running between 4,000 to 6,000 files through this script so requesting admin privileges that many times would be unacceptable. In addition, writing the bash script as you mentioned still yields empty output files –  Donald Willis Apr 29 '13 at 1:36
    
See my comment above. –  foxidrive Apr 29 '13 at 10:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The SED: Permission error was the underlying cause of the empty output files that was experienced. Running bash in administrative privileges was only a work around that didn't fix the actual problem. For some reason, sed.exe became corrupt. The solution was comprised of downloading UnxUtils from http://sourceforge.net/projects/unxutils/?source=dlp and replacing the sed.exe found from CYGWIN/bin/ and replacing it with the one in the UnxUtils zip file.

I ran my script after these steps and everything worked perfectly as it did prior to the issue.

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