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I know of a couple of routines that work as follows:

Xn+1 = Routine(Xn, max)

For example, something like a LCG generator:

Xn+1 = (a*Xn + c) mod m

There isn't enough parameterization in this generator to generate every sequence.

Dream Function:

Xn+1 = Routine(Xn, max, permutation number)

This routine, parameterized by an index into the set of all permutations, would return the next number in the sequence. The sequence may be arbitrarily large (so storing the array and using factoradic numbers is impractical.

Failing that, does anyone have pointers to similar functions that are either stateless or have a constant amount of state for arbitrary 'max', such that they will iterate a shuffled list.

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Do you want a solution to the math problem? or just an O(1) (memory) algorithm to do the job? – Chris Cudmore Oct 2 '08 at 14:44

There are n! permutations of n elements. Storing which one you're using requires at least log(n!) / log(2) bits. By Stirling's approximation, this takes roughly n log(n) / log (2) bits.

Explicitly storing one index takes log(n) / log(2) bits. Storing all n, as in an array of indices takes n times as many, or again n log(n) / log(2). Information-theoretically, there is no better way than explicitly storing the permutation.

In other words, the index you pass in of what permutation in the set you want takes the same asymptotic storage space as just writing out the permutation. If, for, example, you limit the index of the permutation to 32 bit values, you can only handle permutations of up to 12 elements. 64 bit indices only get you up to 20 elements.

As the index takes the same space as the permutation would, either change your representation to just use the permutation directly, or accept unpacking into an array of size N.

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Given a 32-bit number between 0 and 12!, how would I generate the set of indexes from it iteratively without resorting to memory? I guess I could convert the number to base 12? But, given 32-bit number and 0..12 , how to get next number? – Procedural Throwback Oct 3 '08 at 4:52
    
I'm telling you that you can't. I have code that will store a different permutation of 0..n-1 in an array for each p < n!. But to generate the value at index i in the array, you need to look at the previous values. You can do this implicitly, by recursive calls, but the information must be split. – wnoise Oct 3 '08 at 7:33

From my response to another question:

It is actually possible to do this in space proportional to the number of elements selected, rather than the size of the set you're selecting from, regardless of what proportion of the total set you're selecting. You do this by generating a random permutation, then selecting from it like this:

Pick a block cipher, such as TEA or XTEA. Use XOR folding to reduce the block size to the smallest power of two larger than the set you're selecting from. Use the random seed as the key to the cipher. To generate an element n in the permutation, encrypt n with the cipher. If the output number is not in your set, encrypt that. Repeat until the number is inside the set. On average you will have to do less than two encryptions per generated number. This has the added benefit that if your seed is cryptographically secure, so is your entire permutation.

I wrote about this in much more detail here.

Of course, there's no guarantee that every permutation can be generated (and depending on your block size and key size, that may not even be possible), but the permutations you can get are highly random (if they weren't, it wouldn't be a good cipher), and you can have as many of them as you want.

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This doesn't seem practical for small sets, and if I don't care about security can it be simplified (eg, use same structure?) Also do I need to go In = Dec(Xn), In+1 = In + 1, Xn+1 = Enc(In+1), Or can I do Xn+1 = Enc(Xn) ? – Procedural Throwback Oct 3 '08 at 2:51
    
I doubt it can be simplified much. Ciphers just provide very good mixing, ensuring that every key value maps to a distinct permutation. If you're doing this with small sets, why not just shuffle an array? You can re-encrypt instead of using a counter, but there's no guarantee you won't get a cycle. – Nick Johnson Oct 3 '08 at 7:37
    
This doesn't iterate through the elements of a specific permutation. Iterating through a random one is possible in space of n bits, but you still need a random source of n log n bits. – wnoise Oct 3 '08 at 9:29
    
No, you can't pick a specific permutation, but as has already been pointed out by wnoise, the space required to index the permutation you wanted is proportional to the size of the permutation - so it's simply not possible to do it 'compactly'. My answer covers your 'failing that' case. – Nick Johnson Oct 3 '08 at 11:24

If you are wanting a function that takes up less stack space, then you should look into using an iterated version, rather than a function. You can also use a datastructure like a TreeMap, and have it stored on disk, and read on an as needed basis.

X(n+1) = Routine(Xn, max, permutation number)
for(i = n; i > 0; i--)
 {
   int temp = Map.lookup(i) 
   otherfun(temp,max,perm)
 }
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Is it possible to index a set of permutations without previously computing and storing the whole thing in memory? I tried something like this before and didn't find a solution - I think it is impossible (in the mathematical sense).

Disclaimer: I may have misunderstood your question...

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I suspect that it is, although there may be something awesome using the factoradic numbers that I missed. For practical purposes, having a multiple functions with multiple starting points and parameterization may be good enough.. – Procedural Throwback Oct 2 '08 at 14:45
    
Yes, it is possible. The simplest way is to take the number and write it out in variable base digits. – wnoise Oct 3 '08 at 1:48

Code that uses an iterate interface. Time complexity is O(n^2), Space complexity has an overhead of: copy of n (log n bits), an iteration variable (log n bits), keeping track of n-i (log n bits), , copy of current value (log n bits), copy of p (n log n bits), creation of next value (log n bits), and a bit set of used values (n bits). You can't avoid an overhead of n log n bits. Timewise, this is also O(n^2), for setting the bits. This can be reduced a bit, but at the cost of using a decorated tree to store the used values.

This can be altered to use arbitrary precision integers and bit sets by using calls to the appropriate libraries instead, and the above bounds will actually start to kick in, rather than being capped at N=8, portably (an int can be the same as a short, and as small as 16 bits). 9! = 362880 > 65536 = 2^16

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef signed char index_t;
typedef unsigned int permutation;

static index_t permutation_next(index_t n, permutation p, index_t value)
{
    permutation used = 0;
    for (index_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        index_t left = n - i;
        index_t digit = p % left;
        p /= left;
        for (index_t j = 0; j <= digit; ++j) {
            if (used & (1 << j)) {
                digit++;
            }
        }
        used |= (1 << digit);
        if (value == -1) {
            return digit;
        }
        if (value == digit) {
            value = -1;
        }
    }
    /* value not found */
    return -1;
}

static void dump_permutation(index_t n, permutation p)
{
    index_t value = -1;
    fputs("[", stdout);
    value = permutation_next(n, p, value);
    while (value != -1) {
        printf("%d", value);
        value = permutation_next(n, p, value);
        if (value != -1) {
            fputs(", ", stdout);
        }
    }
    puts("]");
}

static int factorial(int n)
{
    int prod = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
        prod *= i;
    }
    return prod;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    const index_t n = 4;
    const permutation max = factorial(n);
    for (permutation p = 0; p < max; ++p) {
        dump_permutation(n, p);
    }
}
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Code that unpacks a permutation index into an array, with a certain mapping from index to permutation. There are loads of others, but this one is convenient.

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef unsigned char index_t;
typedef unsigned int permutation;

static void permutation_to_array(index_t *indices, index_t n, permutation p)
{
    index_t used = 0;
    for (index_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        index_t left = n - i;
        index_t digit = p % left;
        for (index_t j = 0; j <= digit; ++j) {
            if (used & (1 << j)) {
                digit++;
            }
        }
        used |= (1 << digit);
        indices[i] = digit;
        p /= left;
    }
}

static void dump_array(index_t *indices, index_t n)
{
    fputs("[", stdout);
    for (index_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        printf("%d", indices[i]);
        if (i != n - 1) {
            fputs(", ", stdout);
        }
    }
    puts("]");
}

static int factorial(int n)
{
    int prod = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
        prod *= i;
    }
    return prod;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    const index_t n = 4;
    const permutation max = factorial(n);
    index_t *indices = malloc(n * sizeof (*indices));
    for (permutation p = 0; p < max; ++p) {
        permutation_to_array(indices, n, p);
        dump_array(indices, n);
    }
    free(indices);
}
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