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I have been refreshing my memory about sorting algorithms the past few days and I've come across a situation where I can't find what the best solution is.

I wrote a basic implementation of quicksort, and I wanted to boost its performance by parallelizing its execution.

What I've got is that:

template <typename IteratorType>
void quicksort(IteratorType begin, IteratorType end)
{
  if (distance(begin, end) > 1)
  {
    const IteratorType pivot = partition(begin, end);

    if (distance(begin, end) > 10000)
    {
      thread t1([&begin, &pivot](){ quicksort(begin, pivot); });
      thread t2([&pivot, &end](){ quicksort(pivot + 1, end); });

      t1.join();
      t2.join();
    }
  }
}

While this works better than the naive "without-threads" implementation, this has serious limitations, namely:

  • If the array to sort is too big or the recursion goes too deep, the system can run out of threads and the execution fails miserably.
  • The cost of creating threads in each recursive call could probably be avoided, especially given that threads are not an infinite resource.

I wanted to use a thread pool to avoid the late-thread creation but I face then another problem:

  • Most of the thread I create do all their work at first, then do nothing while they are awaited for completion. This results in a lot of threads just waiting for sub-calls to finish which seems rather sub-optimal.

Is there a technique/entity I could use to avoid wasting threads (allow their reuse)?

I can use boost or any C++11 facilities.

share|improve this question
    
You're looking for a "work-stealing" library. But I doubt C++11 or Boost has one. –  Mysticial Apr 28 '13 at 8:02
    
I'm pretty sure there's an in-place, iterative implementation of quicksort. Perhaps that would be an easy way to handle threads waiting and remove recursive limitations as well. –  rliu Apr 28 '13 at 8:46
1  
Check the parallel quicksort from this link stackoverflow.com/questions/16248321/…. This is a parallel quicksort implementation from "C++ Concurency in action" by A.Williams (boost threads implementer). And this is the book on the subject. –  SChepurin Apr 28 '13 at 8:54
    
YOu might want to take a look at Intel Cilk-Plus which uses work-stealing. There is a special gcc 4.8 branch. –  TemplateRex Apr 28 '13 at 11:17
    
A good task pool won't require join -- instead, you create tasks and get std::future's out. The tasks sent to be done will be dispatched to threads, generate an answer, and exit. For your code, you'd partition, create a task that sorts the first and second half, then schedule the "I am done" message when both of those tasks are done (maybe via a then mechanism on both futures, or from help from the task pool). Then your code would exit, returning the constructed future. –  Yakk Apr 28 '13 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the array to sort is too big or the recursion goes too deep, the system can run out of threads and the execution fails miserably.

So go sequential after a maximum depth...

template <typename IteratorType>
void quicksort(IteratorType begin, IteratorType end, int depth = 0)
{
  if (distance(begin, end) > 1)
  {
    const IteratorType pivot = partition(begin, end);

    if (distance(begin, end) > 10000)
    {
      if (depth < 5) // <--- HERE
      { // PARALLEL
        thread t1([&begin, &pivot](){ quicksort(begin, pivot, depth+1); });
        thread t2([&pivot, &end](){ quicksort(pivot + 1, end, depth+1); });

        t1.join();
        t2.join();
      }
      else
      { // SEQUENTIAL
        quicksort(begin, pivot, depth+1);
        quicksort(pivot + 1, end, depth+1);
      }
    }
  }
}

With depth < 5 it will create a maximum of ~50 threads, which will easily saturate most multi-core CPUs - further parallism will yield no benefit.

The cost of creating threads in each recursive call could probably be avoided, especially given that threads are not an infinite resource.

Sleeping threads don't really cost as much as people think, but there is no point in creating two new threads at each branch, may as well reuse the current thread, rather than put it to sleep...

template <typename IteratorType>
void quicksort(IteratorType begin, IteratorType end, int depth = 0)
{
  if (distance(begin, end) > 1)
  {
    const IteratorType pivot = partition(begin, end);

    if (distance(begin, end) > 10000)
    {
      if (depth < 5)
      {
        thread t1([&begin, &pivot](){ quicksort(begin, pivot, depth+1); });
        quicksort(pivot + 1, end, depth+1);   // <--- HERE

        t1.join();
      } else {
        quicksort(begin, pivot, depth+1);
        quicksort(pivot + 1, end, depth+1);
      }
    }
  }
}

Alternatively to using depth, you can set a global thread limit, and then only create a new thread if the limit hasn't been reached - if it has, than do it sequentially. This thread limit can be process wide so parallel calls to quicksort will back off co-operatively from creating too many threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I came to same conclusion about the part "why would I create two threads at each call ?" If I indeed were to use a global counter for my threads, what would you use to make this counter thread-safe ? –  ereOn Apr 28 '13 at 9:28
1  
@ereOn Even with these suggestions just don't use raw-threads or thread-pools directly for nested data-/recursive parallel algorithms. –  snk_kid Apr 28 '13 at 9:52
    
@user1131467 Purely aesthetic!?!? thanks for the lols. –  snk_kid Apr 28 '13 at 10:53
2  
@user1131467 That's okay if you're dealing with purely flat data-parallelism but that is not what we are dealing with here and that is not what I'm talking about. Writing recursive/nested data parallel algorithms with this approach is poor and an inefficient method and it is well known in to have all sorts of problems, over-subscription, poor load-balancing, etc. So yes you can do significantly better in this case and it's not "magic" (I found that highly insulting) there are various papers and implementations on the subject the current leading one being the work-stealing algorithm. –  snk_kid Apr 28 '13 at 13:02
2  
@user1131467 but this approach is not optimal! (your posted code) and does not scale well, that's my point! even the OP knows this. A thread-pool only helps with mitigating the cost of thread-creation but you're still using a variable number of threads depending on how broad/deep the recursion goes. If you used a job/task based system there is always a fixed number of worker threads regardless of how many tasks are spawned. The thread count is fixed and typically equal to the number of hardware threads. I work in the games industry and we never write parallel algorithms like in your code. –  snk_kid Apr 28 '13 at 15:10

I am not C++ thread expert but once you solve the thread problem, you'll have another one:

The call to partition the input is not parallelized. That call is quite expensive (it requires sequential iteration over the array).

You can read the parallel section of qsort in wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksort#Parallelization

It suggests that a simple solution to parallelize qsort with roughly the same speed as your approach, is to divide the array into several subarrays (e.g. as many as there are CPU cores), sort each one in parallel and merge the result using a technique from merge-sort.

There are better parallel sorting algorithms but they can get quite complicated.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, the calls to quicksort (which in turn call partition) are paralellized, so calls partition actually are paralellized too. Thanks for the article link. –  ereOn Apr 28 '13 at 8:24
2  
@ereOn: yes, but you have a severe load imbalance problem. Your recursion is only o(lg(N)) deep (e.g. 20 levels for 1M items), and your first level is entirely sequential, your second level only has parallelism 2, and so on. By using a sequential partition() you severely limit your maximum speedup (well below what is possible.) –  Wandering Logic Apr 28 '13 at 13:33

Using threads directly for writing parallel algorithms, especially divide-and-conquer type algorithms is a bad idea, you will have poor scaling, poor load-balancing and as you know the cost of thread-creation is expensive. Thread-pools can help with the latter but not the former without writing extra code. Nowadays almost all modern parallel frameworks are based on top of a task based work-stealing scheduler, such examples are Intel TBB, Microsoft concurrency run-time (concert)/PPL.

Instead of spawning threads or re-using threads from a pool what happens is a "task" (typically a closure + some bookkeeping data) is put onto work-stealing queue(s) to be run at some point by one of X number of worker threads. Typically the number of threads is equal to the number of hardware threads available on the system, so it does not matter so much if you spawn/queue hundreds/thousands tasks (well it does in some cases but depends on the context). This is a much better situation for nested/divide and conquer/fork-join parallel algorithms.

For (nested) data-parallel algorithms it best to avoid spawning a task per element because typically an operation on a single element the granularity of work is far too small to gain any benefits and outweighed by the overhead of scheduler management so on top of the lower-level work-stealing scheduler you have a higher-level management that deals with dividing up a container into chunks. This is still a much better situation than using threads/thread-pools because you are not dividing up based on the optimal thread-count anymore.

Anyways there is nothing like this standardized in C++11, if you want a pure standard library solution without adding third-party dependencies the best you can do is either:

A. Try using std::async, some implementations like VC++ will use a work-stealing scheduler underneath but there are no guarantees and the C++ standard does not enforce this.

B. Write you own working-steal scheduler on top the standard thread primitives that comes with C++11, it is doable but not so simple to implement correctly.

I'd say just go with Intel TBB it is mostly cross-platform and provides various high-level parallel algorithms like parallel sorting.

share|improve this answer
    
Basically, you advise in this and similar cases do not manage threads by yourself but to allow some kind of scheduler (explicit or implicit one) to do the job. Unfortunately, all these implementations require a deep knowledge on the very difficult subject. –  SChepurin Apr 28 '13 at 10:41
    
OpenMP is worth mentioning here. I found it easier to use than TBB –  Jakub M. Apr 28 '13 at 10:46
    
Intel TBB, OpenMP, and the like, are userland libraries. Under the hood they call the create thread method (clone on Linux, CreateThread on windows, etc) just like std::thread and everyone else. It's important to understand what a thread actually is, and how the operating system manages them, in order to understand their performance implications. Many people do not understand how cheap it is to create a thread and how good of a job the kernel does at switching between them, consequently they worry about trivial optimizations that achieve very little. –  Andrew Tomazos Apr 29 '13 at 8:04

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