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It's been a while since Visual Studio added support for a foreach extension that works like

vector<int> v(3)
for each (int i in v) {
  printf("%d\n",i);
}

I want to know how to make any class able to use foreach. Do I need to implement some interface?

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MS compiler never supported anyting like that for C++ code. I'd guess you are talking about some other language. C#? If so, you need to retag your question. –  AndreyT Oct 26 '09 at 17:32
3  
2  
Maybe the c++ tag should be a vc++ tag. This is certainly not a standard c++ question. –  MAK Oct 26 '09 at 17:53
    
Avoid this like the plague. If you must be lazy and use foreach. Then use the boost version that is at least portable. –  Loki Astari Oct 26 '09 at 19:36
    
Boost usually means bloat. –  stelonix Oct 27 '09 at 12:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

for each statement in VC++, when used on a non-managed class:

for each (T x in xs)
{
    ...
}

is just syntactic sugar for this:

for (auto iter = xs.begin(), end = xs.end(); iter != end; ++iter)
{
     T x = *iter;
}

Where auto means that type of variable is deduced automatically from type of initializer.

In other words, you need to provide begin() and end() methods on your class that would return begin and end input iterators for it.

Here is an example of class that wraps an istream and allows you to iterate over all lines in it:

#include <istream>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>


class lines
{
public:

    class line_iterator
    {
    public:

        line_iterator() : in(0)
        {
        }

        line_iterator(std::istream& in) : in(&in)
        {
            ++*this;
        }

        line_iterator& operator++ ()
        {
            getline(*in, line);
            return *this;
        }

        line_iterator operator++ (int)
        {
            line_iterator result = *this;
            ++*this;
            return result;
        }

        const std::string& operator* () const
        {
            return line;
        }

        const std::string& operator-> () const
        {
            return line;
        }

        friend bool operator== (const line_iterator& lhs, const line_iterator& rhs)
        {
            return (lhs.in == rhs.in) ||
                   (lhs.in == 0 && rhs.in->eof()) ||
                   (rhs.in == 0 && lhs.in->eof());
        }

        friend bool operator!= (const line_iterator& lhs, const line_iterator& rhs)
        {
            return !(lhs == rhs);
        }

    private:

        std::istream* const in;
        std::string line;
    };


    lines(std::istream& in) : in(in)
    {
    }

    line_iterator begin() const
    {
        return line_iterator(in);
    }

    line_iterator end() const
    {
        return line_iterator();
    }

private:

    std::istream& in;
};


int main()
{
    std::ifstream f(__FILE__);
    for each (std::string line in lines(f))
    {
        std::cout << line << std::endl;
    }
}

Note that implementation of line_iterator is actually somewhat bigger than the minimum needed by for each; however, it is the minimum implementation that conforms to input iterator requirements, and thus this class is also usable with all STL algorithms that work on input iterators, such as std::for_each, std::find etc.

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can you give the simplest example of a class implementing those that will compile? Just need to know the methods' return types and whatever else I'm missing, because I'm not being able to compile with a simple class –  stelonix Oct 26 '09 at 17:42
    
You need to provide begin and end iterators. –  GManNickG Oct 26 '09 at 17:50
    
Updated answer to include example. Actual return types do not matter, so long as they support all operations that are implied by described expansion of for each. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 26 '09 at 17:59
    
@Pavel: Is this really an input iterator? Usually input iterators yield different values for consecutive *it invocations and their increment operations do nothing. That might not be a requirement, though, in which case this is indeed an input iterator. But in this case it is still an over-engineered one, since an input iterator wouldn't need the line member. Returning the result of std::getline (as an rvalue) from *it would suffice. –  sbi Oct 26 '09 at 19:05
    
@sbi: you are correct in that incrementing in operator* is actually sufficient. However, this is not a requirement in and of itself - the ability to do so stems from the definition of ++ and * and their interactions for input iterators, and these can be satisfied in other ways. In any case, the question wasn't on iterators as such, but rather for each, so I went for code that is hopefully clearer in intent for a person who'd never written any kind of iterator before, even if not as tight as it should really be. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 26 '09 at 19:56

You can use this

std::for_each

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+1 Prefer standards to non-standard extensions whenever possible. –  Adrian McCarthy Oct 26 '09 at 18:16
3  
std::for_each isn't really a replacement because it doesn't let you specify the block of code to execute for each iteration inline. In practice, I almost never see std::for_each used precisely for this reason - it's just easier to write a good old for loop with iterators. As for for each - it definitely doesn't have any place in portable code, but not all code is meaningfully portable anyway. If your application is already written using MFC or ATL, then you're stuck with VC++ anyway, and there's nothing wrong with using its language extensions either. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 26 '09 at 19:58
    
Well, if portability isn't a requirement, I'd like throw lambda functions into the pool and vote this answer up. They are bound to be implemented by some compilers by now or pretty soon, and they will indeed make std::for_each the better solution, since they will become the standard that (hopefully) all compilers eventually will support. –  sbi Oct 26 '09 at 21:54

foreach isn't part of the C++ language as far as I know. It's in C# though. Also, I think STL and/or Boost has a foreach method. Perhaps you're thinking about that one?

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1  
I'm aware it's not part of the language and I'm also aware there's a foreach in the STL and in Boost. However, the visual studio compiler supports foreach in the way I showed as a compiler extension, and I'd like to know how to make classes that work with it. –  stelonix Oct 26 '09 at 17:30
    
Ah okay, sorry for misunderstanding. –  Jorge Israel Peña Oct 26 '09 at 17:37
    
Downvoted for misunderstanding, then apologizing for it? Turns out someone went on a downvoting spree. –  Jorge Israel Peña Oct 26 '09 at 20:43

Your class should inherit IEnumerable to use foreach

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