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we have a function can permit user input a integer/a string format/list format

   def testsum(data):
        if(type(data)==type(1)):
            data=map(int,str(data))

        for i in map(int,data):
            #print(type(i))
            print(i,i+20)

    if __name__=="__main__":
        testsum(1)#OK
        testsum([2,3,4])#OK
        testsum("123")#FAILS,we hope to be 143
        testsum(['5','6'])#OK
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Apr 29 '13 at 12:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
What is this function even supposed to do? – Blender Apr 28 '13 at 8:46
    
I don't understand testsum("123")#FAILS,we hope to be 143 – jamylak Apr 28 '13 at 8:49
1  
It is an IQ test? If not then more Pythonic is: 17) "If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea." 18) "If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea." (Zen of Python) – hynekcer Apr 28 '13 at 8:55
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I guess you're looking for something like:

def testsum(data):
    if not isinstance(data, list):
        data = [data]

    for i in map(int,data):
        print(i,i+20)

Note that it' usually not a good idea to design your functions like this. Better write two different functions, one for lists (iterables) and one for strings.

share|improve this answer
    
ohh 143 was a typo this makes sense – jamylak Apr 28 '13 at 8:54
    
You get exception on "1a3" – Denis Apr 28 '13 at 9:16
    
That isn't in the domain of the function – HennyH Apr 28 '13 at 9:20

The pythonic way is always as close as possible to one line.

testsum = lambda data: data if isinstance(data,int) else sum([v*10**(len(data)-i) for i,v in enumerate(map(int,data),1)])

print(testsum(1))
print(testsum([2,3,4]))
print(testsum("123"))
print(testsum(['5','6']))

Or un-one-lined:

def testsum(data):
    if isinstance(data,int):
        return data
    else:
        return sum([v*10**(len(data)-i) for i,v in enumerate(map(int,data),1)])

Outputs:

1
234
123
56
share|improve this answer
    
Is that a joke? Complicated one-liners are positively anti-Pythonic. – mfitzp Apr 28 '13 at 10:23
    
Somewhat, I would agree that this one-liner loses the readability which comes with a one line statement due to its length/complexity, however I find terse one-lines much easier to understand than the equivalent 5-8 line long equivalent. – HennyH Apr 28 '13 at 10:34
    
You can definitely go too far the other way, your un-one-lined example above is spot on for readability imo. – mfitzp Apr 28 '13 at 11:06

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