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I have URL like this:

http://example.com/site1
http://example.com/site2
     ...  ...
http://example.com/siten

Yes, there are a list of sites.

But actually I would like to access the subsites by( take site1 for example ):

http://site1.example.com

What I have done in nginx.conf was :

if ($host = site1\.example\.com){
    rewrite ^/(.*) /example.com/site1/$1 break;

}

Yeah, test in local machine and I have edited /etc/hosts:

127.0.0.1  example.com

But not work. Can anyone explains?

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You got me wrong: not 127.0.0.1 example.com, but 127.0.0.1 subdomain.example.com and make sure that space between ...0.1 subdomain... is either tab space or few empty space characters. Best bet is to copy existing entry in hosts file that was before you have edited anything and simple to replace existing with 127.0.0.1 subdomain.example.com. Cheers –  Miloshio Apr 28 '13 at 12:22
    
I have solved this with the help of my workmate. It should be : add proxy_set_header HOST $host; and if ($host = site1.example.com) { rewrite ^/(.*) /site1/$1 break; } . Of course, I should add 127.0.0.1 site1.example.com in /etc/hosts. –  holys Apr 28 '13 at 16:36

1 Answer 1

You MUST specify CNAME record for subdomain feature. Without it, no web server config rule will work.

In your DNS record management panel (whatever you use), you must create subdomain.domain.com and point DNS A record to IP where is domain.com is routed.

For local machine find hosts file, open it with administrator privileges and add 127.0.0.1 subdomain.domain.com in new line.

share|improve this answer
    
What should I do in local machine? –  holys Apr 28 '13 at 9:47
    
Edit hosts file. Find hosts file and type for example, 127.0.0.1 sub.example.com –  Miloshio Apr 28 '13 at 9:49

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