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Basically I want to to have a page built out of equally sized divs for example 100x100 but also variants of that like 200x100. They all float: left to adjust to resizing of the window accordingly. The problem is, I have no idea how to get them to be centered in the that scenario, say sometimes 3 in a row or other times 7 because normally you'd have more space on the right making it look off center. Thanks in advance!

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2  
Is this the layout you're after? i.imgur.com/JEmWoOT.png – Kos May 6 '13 at 10:22
1  
Please, post some layout image and/or some code you have so far – HerrSerker May 8 '13 at 10:58
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you looking for something like this? Setting an automatic margin on the container will center it horizontally. From there, you can either float or inline your blocks in order to display them in the manner you're speaking. Take a look at the CSS and HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div></div>
    <div class="variant"></div>
    <div></div>
    <div></div>
    ...
</div>

This HTML is about as simple as it gets semantically. Ideally, I'd normally do this as an unordered list, but since your title mentions divs in the title, I went that direction.

div.container div{
    border: solid 2px black;
    min-height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    display: inline-block;
    background-color: white;
    vertical-align: top;
    margin: 10px;
}
div.container div.variant{
    width: 200px;
}
div.container{
    margin: auto;
    max-width: 620px;
    background-color: #ecefec;
    padding: 10px;
    font-size: 0;
}

JS Fiddle

What's going on here

We're inlining the block elements via the property display: inline-block; with that we need to make a few additional rules in order to have them display correctly in the event that they have varying heights (these will automatically clear a row, unlike a floated element).

The property vertical-align:top on the inline element ensures that it is arranged so that the top border of the element lies flush with the top border of its sibling elements.

The property font-size:0 ensures that markup whitespace is not factored into the calculation of spacing between the block elements (otherwise every space between the close of one div tag to the opening of another is included).

That should accomplish what you are trying to achieve.

UPDATE

After looking at your comment in response to another question, we need to add text-align:center; to the container div's CSS, as this will center each row within the container.

Example

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1  
Thanks, this is very informative, but doesn't solve one particular problem: When the container shrinks below max width, the boxes are no longer centered (the space is only on the right) (first demo). If you use text-align: center, then each row is centered individually, which completely breaks their grid-like layout (second demo). – Kos May 12 '13 at 19:44
1  
Unfortunately, the scenario being described isn't possible without getting into some pretty heavy javascript. Even a display: table layout would need a fixed width. Otherwise, please look into the flexbox pattern. It's designed for difficult layout problems like this (with no clear solution). However, browser adoption is spotty at this point. – Josh Burgess May 13 '13 at 19:19

I'm not quite sure what you're after (an image might help), but if I understand correctly, you should be able to implement your layout using inline-blocks instead of floats:

  • set display: inline-block on your divs,
  • set text-align: center (or perhaps justify) on the container.

Some reading on that:

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Wrong (red space): tinypic.com/view.php?pic=b4aqzl&s=5 Right (same space on each side): tinypic.com/view.php?pic=334ntk0&s=5 – user1826176 Apr 28 '13 at 11:53
1  
OK, I think I understand - jsfiddle.net/VYUKf you want a layout that is centered as a whole, but retains the grid-like appearance of "text-align: left", right? – Kos Apr 28 '13 at 13:13
    
Yes that's pretty much it, but in that case it doesn't stay in grid like on my image example, each line has it's own center. – user1826176 Apr 28 '13 at 13:44

I have a solution that I think meets your need. It uses media queries to adjust the container width to be the largest multiple of the block width that will fit in the current viewport width. That container is then centered with auto margins, and the blocks within are just left aligned.

Since the container is always an exact multiple of the block width, there will never be excess space within the container. And the container itself is also centered, so the spacing on either side will be perfectly balanced.

Calculating the media-queries is a bit tedious, so I prefer to do that with SASS, but you shouldn't need a huge number of them if your blocks are reasonably large (the bigger the blocks the less media queries required).

Codepen example using SASS

If you'd prefer LESS, or just plain old CSS, I'll gladly provide a conversion.

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1  
Media queries for the win? A nice, out of the box idea. There goes my +150 since it actually works how I envisioned it; I hope it helps the OP too. :-) – Kos May 12 '13 at 19:37
1  
I'm glad you liked the solution. That's an awesome bounty. Thank you. :) – James Holderness May 12 '13 at 19:43

There are so many questions and answers on this page that it becomes quite hard to figure out what OP really wants, but here is my attempt at helping out. Building on top of the pretty looking jsFiddle provided by Josh Burgess in his answer. I am not sure if his jsFiddle is already exactly what Kos or OP are after, but I would like to add to his answer with an alternative approach using the flexbox model, as this adds quite a number of other options which you might want to take into consideration.

Firstly, the flexbox model has been undergoing quite a bit of change over the last few years, a brand new implementation is currently fully supported by Chrome and Opera and partially supported by a number of other major browsers. When it comes to support for the functionality which is required to get the examples below to work, I believe they should work in all current versions of the major browsers except in FireFox. The forecast is that Firefox will be fully supporting the new flexbox model in version 22, which is scheduled to be released on June 25, 2013.

Now here's a copy of Josh Burgess jsFiddle portraying the exact same looks and behaviour as the updated example jsFiddle provided by him, but using the flexbox model to accomplish this.

div.container {
    margin: auto;
    max-width: 620px;
    background-color: #ecefec;
    padding: 10px;
    font-size: 0;

    display: -webkit-flex;    /* Chrome */
    display: -ms-flexbox;     /* IE 10 */    
    display: flex;            /* Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */

    /* Chrome */
    -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
    -webkit-justify-content: center;

    /* IE10 */
    -ms-flex-flow: row wrap;
    -ms-justify-content: center;

    /* Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */
    flex-flow: row wrap;
    justify-content: center;
}

Now have a look at what happens when I change the justify-content value to:

If you didn't mind about the div's not being a specific width, you could even set them to be auto-resizing flex boxes like I have done in this jsFiddle, which effectively turns the div's width's into min-width's.

div.container div {
  -webkit-flex: auto;        /* Chrome */
  -ms-flex: auto;            /* IE10 */
  flex: auto;                /* Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */
}

In any case this is pretty powerful stuff, I think. And, although I realise that the fact that it will not yet work flawlessly in all major browsers is probably a big enough hurdle for anyone to jump when it comes to actually implementing this at the current moment, I believe this functionality should be mentioned on a page with a question like OP's question.

Besides that, maybe, just in case Josh Burgess answer is still not exactly what Kos or OP are looking for, some of the provided jsFiddles (when looked at in a browser that supports them) could be used to explain what exactly it is they are looking for.

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1  
Thanks, I'm only starting to learn flexbox and this is very informative. However I believe it doesn't match the OP's goal (and yes, I understand that it might not have been described well enough). Please have a look at James Holderness' demo; do you think it's possible for flexbox to simplify it? I'd love to know whether that's the case. – Kos May 12 '13 at 19:40

Are you looking something like?

HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div class="small"></div>
    <div class="large"></div>
    <div class="small"></div>
    <div class="mini"></div>
    <div class="small"></div>
    <div class="mini"></div>
    <div class="small"></div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
    text-align: center;
    letter-spacing:-0.25em;
    word-spacing: -0.25em;
}
.small, .large, .mini {
    display: inline-block;
    *display: inline;
    zoom: 1;
    height: 50px;
    letter-spacing:normal;
    word-spacing: normal;
}
.small {
    width: 25%;
    background: #f00;
}
.large {
    width: 50%;
    background: #0f0;
}
.mini {
    width: 12.5%;
    background: #00f;
}
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1  
example: jsfiddle.net/n4GzG – Tarun May 6 '13 at 13:07
1  
From what I've understood, the blocks are to be fixed size (increments of 100x100), line-wrapped inside a fluid-width container (@original poster: confirm please :-)) – Kos May 6 '13 at 18:59
1  
@Kos, i saw your examples, but it's look look like impossible with CSS. Because for that you should have to wrap all divs in a container have dynamic div. In that case content(div) inside container will display as per width of container size. But the case you are looking for is like container with should adjust as per width of your first row. That's mean recalculate with of container. It's possible with javaScript only. – Tarun May 7 '13 at 3:42
    
example: jsfiddle.net/n4GzG/1 – Tarun May 7 '13 at 4:02

If I understand you correctly, you have a variable number of elements that are of different widths, and you want to center the group of elements horizontally on the page.

If this is the case, the solution that works for me is this:

HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div class="outer">
        <div class="inner">
            <!-- your elements here -->
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
    overflow: hidden;
}
.container .outer {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
}
.container .outer .inner {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
}

Basically, what's happening is that the .outer div is shifted to the right so that its left edge is in the middle of its parent element. Then, .inner is shifted to the left 50%, meaning the center of .inner is lined up with the left edge of .outer. In the end, .inner and its contents will be centered on the screen, regardless of the total width of the elements within .inner.

Using auto margins requires that the element containing content have a defined width. This solution circumvents that problem at the expense of a bit of non-semantic markup.

Here's a demo that shows it in action:

JsFiddle DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
This is a nice solution, but the grid is no longer centered after some elements get wrapped. – Kos May 8 '13 at 16:03
    
Correct; this solution as-is will only work for a single row of elements. It still appears unclear whether the poster requires this functionality to work for multiple rows of elements within a SINGLE containing element. If he knew ahead of time how many items would appear in each row, he could wrap each set of elements in the markup described above. – jackwanders May 15 '13 at 13:43

HTML:

<div id="container">
    <div class="small"></div>
    <div class="large"></div>
    <div class="small"></div>
    <div class="mini"></div>
    <div class="small"></div>
    <div class="mini"></div>
    <div class="small"></div>
</div>

CSS:

* {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
#container {
    margin: 0px auto;
    overflow: hidden;
    border: 1px solid #f00;
    letter-spacing:-0.25em;
    word-spacing: -0.25em;
    line-height: 0;
}
.small, .large, .mini {
    display: inline-block;
    *display: inline;
    float: left;
    zoom: 1;
    height: 50px;
    letter-spacing:normal;
    word-spacing: normal;
    line-height: auto;
}
.small {
    width: 100px;
    background: #f00;
}
.large {
    width: 200px;
    background: #0f0;
}
.mini {
    width: 50px;
    background: #00f;
}

jQuery:

resizeContainer();

function resizeContainer() {
    var containerWidth = 0;
    $('#container > div').each(function () {
        var self = $(this);
        var offset = self.offset();
        if (offset.top < 2) {
            containerWidth += self.width();
        } else {
            $('#container').css('width', containerWidth);
            return false;
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Example: jsfiddle.net/n4GzG/2 – Tarun May 7 '13 at 4:07

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