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I'm trying to create a sign up form which is only open to students currently studying at a UK university, so need to ensure the email address they enter ends in .ac.uk.

I have the following JS function but it's not working at all.

function valUniEmail()
{

var email = document.getElementById('contactFormEmail');
if (email.innerHTML.match(^[\w!#$%&'*+/=?^`{|}~-]+(?:\.[\w!#$%&'*+/=?`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]*[a-zA-Z0-9])?\.)+(?:\.ac\.uk)$`)
                {
                document.getElementById('tick').style.display = 'display;'
                }
                else
                {
                document.getElementById('cross').style.display = 'none;'
                }


}

Any ideas why this might not be working?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Sorry, but I could send directly a POST request to your server to bypass this security. You have to also implement this on your server side script. If you want to do it "right", use this regex and use a second match like this \.ac\.uk$ to check if there is .ac.uk at the end. –  HamZa Apr 28 '13 at 12:20
    
The display properties value should be "block" and "none", not "display;" and "none;" –  powerbuoy Apr 28 '13 at 12:33
1  
Don't have access to the server, but I'm not dealing with any computer science students, so don't think they'll manage to bypass it haha. Although, thanks I do appreciate your point about security. –  Andy Kaufman Apr 28 '13 at 13:27
    
haha, no problem :) –  HamZa Apr 28 '13 at 13:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should quote the regexp with /.../ and escape any / chars with \/ like this:

/^[\w!#$%&'*+\/=?^`{|}~-]+(?:\.[\w!#$%&'*+\/=?`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]*[a-zA-Z0-9])?\.)+(?:ac\.uk)$/
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, thanks for your answer. The function now runs, but whatever email address I enter, even those that should pass the condition, fail it. –  Andy Kaufman Apr 28 '13 at 12:27
    
@AndyKaufman It seems like the problem was in the fact that we checked for a \. before ac.uk at the twice, so an address test@foo.ac.uk would pass. I've fixed this in the answer. –  Alexey Apr 28 '13 at 12:34
    
Thank you Alexey - that works perfectly! –  Andy Kaufman Apr 28 '13 at 12:38
    
@AndyKaufman You're welcome! –  Alexey Apr 28 '13 at 12:39

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