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I was asked a interesting question relating to datagrams and how they are fragmented, namely what is used to re-assemble the original datagram.

  • I know the ID number in every fragment will be the same to show that they all belong to one larger datagram.
  • I know the FragFlag being set to 1 means that there are more fragments on the way, however a fragment with a FragFlag of 0 means that it is the final fragment.

There is one more thing I am missing, which I assume is that sequence numbers must also be used so that the fragments know which order they must be put back in. However if this is true that kinda confuses me because datagrams use UDP which is supposed to be unreliable and can end up losing packets in transit or send them in the wrong order.

By contrast, TCP is supposed to be reliable and the best way to guarantee packets are sent in the correct order. Do things work differently here because we are dealing with datagrams instead of packets? Or were sequence numbers just created to make UDP more 'reliable'.

Thanks for any help.

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The important difference here is that TCP defines a flow-control between sender and receiver, so both sides are always aware what the status of the communication is, e.g. successful/unsuccessful/ongoing/... . UDP is more low-level: the sender just transmitts some data and doesn't care if it is received or not (of course you can implement in SW some higher level protocol using UDP then).

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However if this is true that kinda confuses me because datagrams use UDP which is supposed to be unreliable and can end up losing packets in transit or send them in the wrong order.

Why is that confusing? If all the fragments arrive, the datagram is reassembled (at the IP layer) and delivered to the application. If they don't, bad luck.

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