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I have a data.frame

ID  code1   code2  code3
A    143     143    144
A    35      453     35
A             35     15
B    46      46      45
B    12      43     765
C    255     455     344
C    343     343     343
C    343     23      23

each code appears in one time

the id may be repeated. The real data.frame is very large

ID  code1   code2  code3
A    143             144
A    35      453     
A             35     15
B    46              45
B    12      43      765
C    255     455     344
C    343          
C    343     23      

thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This solution is likely to be somewhat inefficient, but that is mostly because of transforming the data back and forth between wide and long and wide. However, you might find it easier to work with your data in a "long" form.

First, generate a second ID, since you have IDs spanning multiple rows.

mydf$ID2 <- with(mydf, ave(ID, ID, FUN = seq_along))

Second, use melt from the "reshape2" package to make your data into a long form.

library(reshape2)
m.df <- melt(mydf, id.vars=c("ID", "ID2"))

With the data in its long form, it is much easier to identify duplicates and replace them with NA.

m.df[duplicated(m.df[setdiff(names(m.df), "variable")]), "value"] <- NA

If you are happy with your data in the long form. Stop there. If you want to get it back to its wide form, use dcast (again from "reshape2").

dcast(m.df, ID + ID2 ~ variable)
#   ID ID2 code1 code2 code3
# 1  A   1   143    NA   144
# 2  A   2    35   453    NA
# 3  A   3    NA    35    15
# 4  B   1    46    NA    45
# 5  B   2    12    43   765
# 6  C   1   255   455   344
# 7  C   2   343    NA    NA
# 8  C   3   343    23    NA

For reference, this is also doable in base R, but the syntax is more clumsy (even though it might perform better than the "reshape2" equivalents).

mydf$ID2 <- with(mydf, ave(ID, ID, FUN = seq_along))
m.df <- cbind(mydf[c("ID", "ID2")], 
              stack(mydf[setdiff(names(mydf), c("ID", "ID2"))]))
m.df[duplicated(m.df[setdiff(names(m.df), "ind")]), "values"] <- NA
cbind(mydf[c("ID", "ID2")], unstack(m.df, values ~ ind))

Update: A possible data.table solution

You may want to explore data.table since you mention that your data are large. Here's one possible solution (though @Arun might have a more direct solution to share).

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(mydf)

## Creates your long data.table
temp <- DT[, list(ID2 = 1:.N, Value = unlist(.SD)), by ="ID"]
## Changes duplicates to NA and adds in the "Code" column
temp[duplicated(temp), Value := NA][, Variable := rep(names(DT)[-1], 
                                                      each = nrow(DT))]
## "Reshapes" the data from long to wide
temp[, as.list(setattr(Value, 'names', Variable)), by=list(ID, ID2)]
#    ID ID2 code1 code1 code1
# 1:  A   1   143    NA   144
# 2:  A   2    35   453    NA
# 3:  A   3    NA    35    15
# 4:  B   1    46    NA    45
# 5:  B   2    12    43   765
# 6:  C   1   255   455   344
# 7:  C   2   343    NA    NA
# 8:  C   3   343    23    NA
share|improve this answer
    
Oops. As @Arun points out, I've gone and mangled the names in my data.table answer. Sorry! –  Ananda Mahto Apr 29 '13 at 9:08
    
sorry if have other variables, but only want to change code1 code2 code3. There are in my data.frame variables "DATE" "BIRTHDAY""ID""code1" "code2""code3" "SEX" thanks –  Hannah May 5 '13 at 5:57
    
m.df=melt(data,measure.vars=c("code1","code1","code1"), id.vars=c("ID", "ID2")) is that? –  Hannah May 5 '13 at 6:18

How about this?

df[, 2:4][t(apply(df[,2:4], 1, duplicated))] <- NA

Edit: A much faster base solution:

for (i in 2:(ncol(df)-1)) {
    for (j in (i+1):ncol(df)) {
        chk <- df[[i]] == df[[j]]
        df[[j]][chk] <- NA
    }
}

Here's a benchmark of the above two methods along with AnandaMahto's reshape2 and data.table methods on bigger data. Using for-loop with right i and j indices seems to be the fastest.

Benchmarking results:

require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(ar.f <- arun.f(df), ar.s <- arun.s(df), 
               an.f <- ananda.ave(df), 
               an.s <- ananda.dt(copy(DT)), times=10)

# Unit: milliseconds

#                 expr       min        lq   median        uq       max neval
#           arun.f(df) 4816.3937 5197.0626 6402.454 6955.9380 7534.6912    10
#           arun.s(df)  114.8372  118.7971  149.284  202.6081  297.4787    10
#       ananda.ave(df) 2877.7936 3288.5935 3650.660 3985.5390 4111.9064    10
#  ananda.dt(copy(DT)) 3383.1229 3861.6379 4432.751 4776.6108 5368.6504    10

Creating Data:

set.seed(1234)
df <- cbind(data.frame(ID = rep(letters[1:20], each=1e4)), stringsAsFactors=FALSE),  
            matrix(sample(1:10, 6 * 1e5, replace=TRUE), ncol=3))
names(df)[2:4] <- paste0("code", 1:3)

My first version:

arun.f <- function(df) {
    df[, 2:4][t(apply(df[,2:4], 1, duplicated))] <- NA
    df
}

My second version:

arun.s <- function(df) {
    for (i in 2:(ncol(df)-1)) {
        for (j in (i+1):ncol(df)) {
            chk <- df[[i]] == df[[j]]
            df[[j]][chk] <- NA
        }
    }
    df
}

Ananda's ave + reshape2 solution:

library(reshape2)
ananda.ave <- function(df) {
    df$ID2 <- with(df, ave(ID, ID, FUN = seq_along))
    m.df <- melt(df, id.vars=c("ID", "ID2"))
    m.df[duplicated(m.df[setdiff(names(m.df), "variable")]), "value"] <- NA
    dcast(m.df, ID + ID2 ~ variable)
}

Ananda's data.table solution:

(modified a bit to be more optimised)

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(df)
ananda.dt <- function(dt) {
    temp <- dt[, list(ID2 = 1:.N, Value = unlist(.SD, use.names=FALSE)), by ="ID"]
    temp[duplicated(temp), Value := NA]
    out <- setnames(temp[, as.list(Value), by=list(ID, ID2)], 3:5, paste0("code", 1:3))
}
share|improve this answer
    
The much-maligned for gets the win (but the original answer is more expressive). –  Matthew Lundberg Apr 28 '13 at 20:13

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