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to install java I have always used the classic way from the terminal. I would like to install java manually. I placed the folder of the JDK on the desk and I set environment variables (PATH, CLASSPATH and JAVA_HOME). From the terminal, if I type "java-version" I get printed

foralobo@ubuntu-vincy:~$ java -version
java version "1.7.0_21"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_21-b11)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.21-b01, mixed mode)

But when I try to install eclipse or netbeans, the system warns by saying that there is no java installed on the machine.

What is missing to compleatare manual installation? (Ubuntu 13.04)

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Added Ubuntu tag. –  Magnilex Apr 28 '13 at 13:57
    
I think you had to run update-alternatives to inform ubuntu where its "new" java installation resides. –  flup Apr 28 '13 at 13:59
    
askubuntu.com/questions/55848/… –  Yan Foto Apr 28 '13 at 14:00
    
askubuntu.com/a/173951/11547 –  Paweł Prażak Jan 24 '14 at 13:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 314 down vote accepted

Using Oracle Java 7 is not formally supported by Ubuntu. There's plenty solutions for installing it, listed on https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Java .

The simplest one listed is this one:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-installer

It'll keep your java 7 installation up to date.

To automatically set up the Java 7 environment variables JAVA_HOME and PATH:

sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-set-default
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4  
To set this version as default - "sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-set-default". Thanks Brent –  user749665 Jan 13 '14 at 23:18
1  
after installing oracle-java7-set-default, I was not able to echo $JAVA_HOME. Hence set $JAVA_HOME manually in .bashrc –  sumitramteke Jan 31 '14 at 5:17
1  
@pekechis both work, apt-add-repository is a symlink to add-apt-repository. Says here it got added in 11.04: askubuntu.com/questions/38021/how-to-add-a-ppa-on-a-server –  flup Feb 6 '14 at 23:41
2  
@sumitramteke I mean to log out and in again. The enviroment variables are set when you log in. –  flup Feb 7 '14 at 14:27
3  
+1 for set as default –  bizzr3 Aug 14 '14 at 8:26

In addition to flup's answer you might also want to run the following to set JAVA_HOME and PATH:

sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-set-default

More information at: http://www.ubuntuupdates.org/package/webupd8_java/precise/main/base/oracle-java7-set-default

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1  
please add this as a comment to @flup answer –  Dan Dec 25 '13 at 11:12
    
I don't have the reputation to comment on other peoples answers yet –  Brent Robinson Jan 6 '14 at 5:01
1  
I've added it, thanks! –  flup Jan 13 '14 at 23:44
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install openjdk-7-jdk

and if you already have other JDK versions installed

sudo update-alternatives --config java

then select the Java 7 version.

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1  
ITYM "sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install openjdk-7-jdk" –  dplass Mar 12 '14 at 0:57
2  
this is the simplest solution, and doesn't involve adding extra repos. –  steve May 18 '14 at 4:58
    
Thanks for "sudo update-alternatives --config java". –  Nadjib Mami May 20 '14 at 9:13

you should use "update-alternatives" command for java. may be this document helpful: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Java

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Oracle Java 1.7.0 from .deb packages

wget https://raw.github.com/flexiondotorg/oab-java6/master/oab-java.sh
chmod +x oab-java.sh
sudo ./oab-java.sh -7
sudo apt-get update
sudo sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-jdk oracle-java7-fonts oracle-java7-source 
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Workaround for 1.7.0_51

There is an Issue 123 currently in OAB and a pull request

Here is the patched vesion:

wget https://raw.github.com/ladios/oab-java6/master/oab-java.sh
chmod +x oab-java.sh
sudo ./oab-java.sh -7
sudo apt-get update
sudo sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-jdk oracle-java7-fonts oracle-java7-source 
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
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I think you should consider Java installation procedure carefully. Following is the detailed process which covers almost all possible failures.

Installing Java with apt-get is easy. First, update the package index:

sudo apt-get update

Then, check if Java is not already installed:

java -version

If it returns "The program java can be found in the following packages", Java hasn't been installed yet, so execute the following command:

sudo apt-get install default-jre

You are fine till now as I assume.

This will install the Java Runtime Environment (JRE). If you instead need the Java Development Kit (JDK), which is usually needed to compile Java applications (for example Apache Ant, Apache Maven, Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA execute the following command:

sudo apt-get install default-jdk

That is everything that is needed to install Java.

Installing OpenJDK 7:

To install OpenJDK 7, execute the following command:

sudo apt-get install openjdk-7-jre 

This will install the Java Runtime Environment (JRE). If you instead need the Java Development Kit (JDK), execute the following command:

sudo apt-get install openjdk-7-jdk

Installing Oracle JDK:

The Oracle JDK is the official JDK; however, it is no longer provided by Oracle as a default installation for Ubuntu.

You can still install it using apt-get. To install any version, first execute the following commands:

sudo apt-get install python-software-properties
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
sudo apt-get update

Then, depending on the version you want to install, execute one of the following commands:

Oracle JDK 7:

sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-installer

Oracle JDK 8:

sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer
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flup's answer is the best but it did not work for me completely. I had to do the following as well to get it working:

  1. export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-7-oracle/jre/
  2. chmod 777 on the folder
  3. ./gradlew build - Building Hibernate
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