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I hope this is not a silly question.
Having 3 basic constructors

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
}

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
}

public MyClass(Context context) {
    super(context);
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
}

Each calls the super class constructor first. So does it mean all common constructor code I have to put in a private method like this?:

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    common(context);
}

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
    common(context);
}

public MyClass(Context context) {
    super(context);
    common(context);
}

private void common(Context context) { ... }

I though that I could chain the constructor for common code, but I get an error saying constructor calls must be the first statement in the code.

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    this(context, attrs);
}

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
    // Some code
    this(context);
}

public MyClass(Context context) {
    super(context);
    // Some more code
}

And the first statement is either the super constructor call or the class constructor call, cannot be both.

Constructor call must be the first statement in a constructor
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1  
You could use this to chain the constructors with the initialization code only present in the last constructor called. –  Luksprog Apr 28 '13 at 14:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The best way is to use this() - You don't need to create a new method, and you respect the DRY principle (Don't Repeat Yourself)

    public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
      super(context, attrs, defStyle);
      // your code here
    }

    public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
       // Assuming 0 is the default value of defStyle, else pass the default value
       this(context, attrs, 0);
    }

    public MyClass(Context context) {
        // Assuming null is the default value for attrs
        this(context, null);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Why is it the best way? –  Lews Therin Apr 28 '13 at 14:52
    
@LewsTherin This is the best way because this() is made for that ;-) You don't have to create another method, you respect the DRY principle and it's easy. –  Thierry Apr 28 '13 at 14:54
    
Put that in your answer then.. assume the OP doesn't know that :) –  Lews Therin Apr 28 '13 at 14:54
    
Done @LewsTherin –  Thierry Apr 28 '13 at 14:59
    
@Thierry Thanks. I guess it was a somewhat silly question. I need to get some sleep man. –  ilomambo Apr 28 '13 at 17:28

You don't have to create another method, you respect the DRY principle and it's easy.

 public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
      super(context, attrs, defStyle);
      // your code here
    }
    public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
       this(context, attrs,null);
    }
    public MyClass(Context context) { 
        this(context,null,null);
    }

you can use in this way

share|improve this answer
    
Code.. but no explanation why it is better? –  Lews Therin Apr 28 '13 at 14:52
    
i agree with taht answer whatever Thierry gave –  PSR Apr 28 '13 at 14:55

What I suggest is put the common code in the most parameterizable constructor and call that constructor from every other (less parameterizable) constructor, with some default values of course for the now missing arguments (you can chain same class constructors with a this(...) statement). If the superclass you're extending is properly designed, you should be able to use your most parameterizable constructor to call its most parameterizable constructor by chaining (with a super(...) statement).

If that doesn't work for your case, then a private method is a very fine way to deal with this, there's usually no benefit in trying to work around it further.

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Well, put the common code in a constructer and make sure to call it from every other constructer take care with last parameter int defStyle, I am assuming that 0 is default for defStyle.

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    common(context);
}

public MyClass(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    this(context, attrs,0);
}

public MyClass(Context context) {
    this(context,null,0);
}

private void common(Context context) { ... }
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