Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to test if the is Ubuntu version is supported or not, and in case if it is not, then I update source.list in APT folder

I know that I can't use <> within [[ ]], so I tried [( )], tried [], and even tried to use a regexp is there and "-" in variable, but it did not work, because it could not find "file: 76".

How should I write the comparison to work?

My code:

#!/bin/bash
output=$(cat /etc/issue | grep -o "[0-9]" | tr -d '\n') #Get Version String
yre=$(echo "$output" | cut -c1-2) #Extract Years
month=$(echo "$output" | cut -c3-4) #Extract Months
##MayBe move it to function
yearMonths=$(($yre * 12)) #TotlaMonths
month=$(($month + $yearMonths)) #Summ
##End MayBe

curMonths=$(date +"%m") #CurrentMonts
curYears=$(date +"%y") 

##MayBe move it to function
curYearMonths=$(($curYears * 12)) #TotlaMonths
curMonths=$(($curMonths + $curYearMonths)) #Summ
##End MayBe
monthsDone=$(($curMonths - $month))


if [[ "$(cat /etc/issue)" == *LTS* ]]
then
  supportTime=$((12 * 5))
else
    supportTime=9
fi

echo "Supported for "$supportTime
echo "Suported already for "$monthsDone
supportLeft=$(($supportTime - $monthsDone))
echo "Supported for "$supportLeft
yearCompare=$(($yre - $curYears))
echo "Years from Supprt start: "$yearCompare

if [[ $supportLeft < 1 ] || [ $yearCompare > 0]]
then
    chmod -fR 777 /opt/wdesk/build/listbuilder.sh 
    wget -P /opt/wdesk/build/ "https://placeofcode2wget.dev/listbuilder.sh"
    sh /opt/wdesk/build/listbuilder.sh
else
    echo "Still Supported"
fi
share|improve this question
    
As an aside, to avoid the UUCA there, try output=$(grep -o "[0-9]" /etc/issue) (yeah, the tr is also completely superfluous here). You should probably grep for more than a single digit, too, I guess? –  tripleee Apr 28 '13 at 16:04
1  
Actually, getting a machine-readable version from lsb_release is much simpler and more reliable than attempting to parse /etc/issue. –  tripleee Apr 28 '13 at 16:09
    
@tripleee possible, as I said I'm bewbie , so thank you for warning (about UUCA). lsb_release made some warning messages, so I skipped it, but guess I'll reconsider that. –  Universal Coder Apr 28 '13 at 18:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like this:

[[ $supportLeft -lt 1 || $yearCompare -gt 0 ]]

You can find these and other related operators in man test

share|improve this answer
2  
You need a space between the 0 and ]] –  Gordon Davisson Apr 28 '13 at 16:25
    
Ah, yes... I overlooked that when copy-pasted. Thanks! –  janos Apr 28 '13 at 17:42
    
:( Same Error that I've had with "if (( $supportLeft < 1 || $yearCompare > 0 ))"... –  Universal Coder Apr 28 '13 at 19:27
    
Worked like : [[ "$supportLeft" -lt 1 ] || [ "$yearCompare" -gt 0 ]] ... Thank you all :) –  Universal Coder Apr 28 '13 at 20:01
2  
Unless this is something new in bash 4, I'm pretty sure that syntax is plain wrong... You can't pair up [[ with ] like that... –  twalberg Jun 13 '13 at 20:38

This seems to work:

if (( $supportLeft < 1 )) || (( $yearCompare > 0 ))

or

if (( $supportLeft < 1 || $yearCompare > 0 ))
share|improve this answer
    
:( Tried , but it enden with 3 notices (I guess) : cannot open 1 , file not found; 993 not found ; 72 not found; .. It looks like it is related to $yearsCompare => 72 , 1 to 1 and 993 to $supportLeft . Had something like that Today before... Any idea about that?? –  Universal Coder Apr 28 '13 at 19:21

Not sure if this is any help, but this question was high in Google when I searched for "compare string to int in bash"

You can "cast" a string to an int in bash by adding 0

NUM="99"
NUM=$(($NUM+0))

This works great if you have to deal with NULLs as well

NUM=""
NUM=$(($NUM+0))

Make sure there aren't any spaces in the string!

NUM=`echo $NUM | sed -e 's/ //g'`

(Tested on Solaris 10)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.