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Consider this bit of Python code:

>>> l = [1,2,3]
>>> l.foo = 'bar'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'foo'
>>> setattr(l, 'foo', 'bar')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'foo'

I understand why this doesn't work -- list has no __dict__ hence it doesn't support attributes.

I'd like to know if there are recommended alternative list collection classes supporting custom properties, or, if there's a good Pythonic 'hack' available to add this to the standard list class.

Or is this a case where it's simpler to roll your own?

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2 Answers 2

This is using setattr that you tried to use in the first place

>>> l = [1,2,3]
>>> lst = Foo(l)
>>> setattr(lst, 'foo', 'bar')
>>> lst.foo
'bar'
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>>> class Foo(list): pass
>>> l = Foo([1,2,3])
>>> l.foo = 'bar'
>>> l
[1, 2, 3]
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Yeah, that's about it. Wrap it in a class. Brain fade... Thanks for the reminder... –  Inactivist Apr 28 '13 at 16:45
    
@Eric what is foo with little caps in l.foo = 'bar' –  octoback Apr 28 '13 at 18:51
    
@antitrust: You mean lowercase? That's just the arbitrary name of a property. The similarity to Foo is coincidental –  Eric Apr 28 '13 at 22:26
    
ok, in this line you declare define the foo attribute for l and assign it value bar, right –  octoback Apr 29 '13 at 6:17

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