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Just wondering if it's possible to do this in css:

http://puu.sh/2IS7n.png

I've created a simplified jfiddle version of my current testing site: http://jsfiddle.net/QhPQa/

HTML:

<header>
    Ight'sul
</header>

CSS:

body {

background: rgb(140,140,140);

}



header{
    height: 200px;
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: top;
    font-size: 140px;
    color: black;
    background: rgb(201,201,201);

    -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 1px 5px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.75);
    -moz-box-shadow:    0px 1px 5px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.75);
    box-shadow:         0px 1px 5px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.75);
}

Anyone know if it's possible, or if I should resort to an image again instead.

share|improve this question
    
I really don't think so, your best option would be to create the image in photoshop and then just set the background to that image –  What have you tried Apr 28 '13 at 17:37
    
Yeah, that's what I was thinking of doing after spending so long searching around. This is my final resort to find if it's possible, else I will use an image. –  Wopian Apr 28 '13 at 17:40
    
what's the problem with using an image? Why waste time on finding a workaround? That's what images are for –  What have you tried Apr 28 '13 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use an image to achieve that effect, but where's the fun in that?? ;)

JSFiddle

HTML

<h1 id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        lgth'sul
    </div>
</h1>

CSS

#inner{
    height: 200px;
    width: 120%;
    position: relative;
    left: -10%;
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 140px;
    color: black;
    background: rgb(201,201,201);
    border-radius: 0 0 50% 50%;

    -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 1px 5px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.75);
    -moz-box-shadow:    0px 1px 5px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.75);
    box-shadow:         0px 1px 5px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.75);
}

#outer {
    background-color: #3d3d3d;
    padding-bottom: 40px;
}

Explanation

The idea is to have the outer div act as the backdrop for the curve and the inner div act as the curve.

Use border-radius to curve the bottom of #inner

 border-radius: 0 0 50% 50%;

Set the width of #inner to a value greater than 100% so that the curvature extends beyond the container and position it to ensure symmetry.

 width: 120%;
 position: relative;
 left: -10%; /*Move back half of excess width*/

Set padding-bottom on #outer and you're done.

share|improve this answer
1  
Given that it's a header, I'd suggest using an h1 (as in the original demo) as the 'outer,' and using a nested div (as you've done already) just for the 'inner,' element. –  David Thomas Apr 28 '13 at 18:10
    
Thank you :) Knew it could be done without images some way –  Wopian Apr 28 '13 at 18:11
    
Updated, thanks @DavidThomas. –  Vimal Stan Apr 28 '13 at 18:12

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