Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry if this is an obvious question, but I can't seem to get it. I'm working on an assignment for a Data Structures course. It involves pulling data from a simple .dat file. We had never used any of the file-accessing options in Java before, so the professor just gave us the working code for that piece. So a class called 'FileReadExample' creates a new buffered reader object, opens a file, and then is supposed to kick out a bunch of data about that file. But I cannot access any of the data at all. In a separate testMain file, I create a new FileReadExample object named fr and then attempt to print out things like fr.readLine() from there, but it tells me there is no such method. I'm sure I'm missing something staggeringly easy.

EDIT - The Professors Code:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;

public class FileReadExample
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("got here");
        try
        {
            BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File("sample-file.dat")));
            System.out.println("File open successful!");

            int line = 0;
            for (String x = in.readLine(); x != null; x = in.readLine())
            {
                line++;
                System.out.println(x);
                if (line <= 3)
                {
                    String[] tokens = x.split(" ");
                    System.out.println("Number of tokens in line " + line + ": " + tokens.length);
                    System.out.println("The tokens are:");
                    for (String token : tokens)
                    {
                        System.out.println(token);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    String[] tokens = x.split("\\|");
                    System.out.println("Number of tokens in line " + line + ": " + tokens.length);
                    System.out.println("The tokens are:");
                    for (String token : tokens)
                    {
                        System.out.println(token);
                    }
                    Integer[] values = new Integer[tokens.length];
                    Integer sum = 0;
                    for (int i = 0; i < tokens.length; i++)
                    {
                        sum += Integer.parseInt(tokens[i]);
                    }
                    System.out.println("Sum: " + sum);
                }
            }
        } catch (IOException e)
        {
            System.out.println("File I/O error!");
        }
    }
}

I can post the code the professor gave, but I can't figure out how to get the formatting right in these posts. Am I reading right that I have to put four spaces in front of every line to get the code formatting properly here? There is no way to just block a whole bunch of code at once? Again, I feel like I am missing something extremely easy there.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by syb0rg, Lucas, Sotirios Delimanolis, Don Roby, p.s.w.g Apr 28 '13 at 17:56

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
to do a block of code, hit the space bar 8 times, and paste your code. –  user2277872 Apr 28 '13 at 17:38
    
if you google it out, I am sure you must get bunch of examples! –  sanbhat Apr 28 '13 at 17:39
    
Have goolged. And YouTubed. And searched here. By everything I can see, it should be working. The only thing that I found that could be the problem is that it is all contained in a try/catch. But I'm not sure why that matters. –  Christopher Robinson Apr 28 '13 at 17:43
    
The code you just posted is working fine for me. Do you get an exception or any error message? –  Matthias Herlitzius Apr 28 '13 at 17:48
    
It compiles, but when I run my test main the cursor blinks and the program ends. Nothing happens, even though the code has a bunch of printlns in it. I guess my question is how to call data from a BufferedReader object within a FileReadExample object created in a separate test main. –  Christopher Robinson Apr 28 '13 at 17:57

2 Answers 2

Try this to read a file:

BufferedReader reader = null;

try {
    File file = new File("sample-file.dat");
    reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));

    String line;
    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(line);
    }

} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    try {
        reader.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You must put your code in try-catch block because you are to read a file and an exception may be thrown at any chance –  Junaid Hassan Apr 28 '13 at 17:55
    
If the method throws an IOException you do not need the try-catch block. BTW other answers for this question are also missing the try-catch block, so this is just an example how to read a file. –  Matthias Herlitzius Apr 28 '13 at 17:57
    
where is your method lols see this stackoverflow.com/a/16265790/2277645 –  Junaid Hassan Apr 28 '13 at 17:58
    
I updated my code; happy now? And regarding your own example please close the BufferedReader appropriately like I just did. In your example the BR will not get closed if an exception is thrown during br.readLine(). –  Matthias Herlitzius Apr 28 '13 at 18:03
    
dear lols i have used it ok don't get angry friend +1 now –  Junaid Hassan Apr 28 '13 at 18:06

As far as i understand fr is the object of your FileReadExample class. So it is obvious it will not have any method like fr.readLine() if you dont create one yourself.

secondly, i think a correct constructor of the BufferedReader class will help you do your task.

String str;
BufferedReader buffread = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File("file.dat")));
str = buffread.readLine();
.
.
buffread.close();

this should help you.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. So the FileReader creates it's own Buffered Reader object called 'in'. So I have an object in my testMain called fr, that should have within it a BufferedReader object that should be accessible. From the test main, how do I call that? fr.in.readLine() doesn't work. The code that you've provided here should go in FileReader or the main? Thanks, and again, sorry if I am missing something obvious. –  Christopher Robinson Apr 28 '13 at 17:55
    
how about you create a method inside FileReadExample class which uses the in.readLine() method and returns a String value. So eg. if you create a method called String readALine() which returns str. you can use it in your testMain class like this-> mystr = fr.readALine(); –  Onkar Borgaonkar Apr 28 '13 at 18:10
    
Boom. That got it. Accessor method, should have thought of that. Thanks. –  Christopher Robinson Apr 28 '13 at 18:24

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.