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What is the best practice when returning data from functions. Is it better to return a Null or an empty object? And why should one do one over the other?

Consider this:

public UserEntity GetUserById(Guid userId)
{
     //Imagine some code here to access database.....

     //Check if data was returned and return a null if none found
     if (!DataExists)
        return null; 
        //Should I be doing this here instead? 
        //return new UserEntity();  
     else
        return existingUserEntity;
}

Lets pretend that there would be valid cases in this program that there would be no user information in the database with that GUID. I Would imagine that it would not be appropriate to throw an exception in this case?? Also I am under the impression that exception handling can hurt performance.

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3  
This is a BUSINESS DOMAIN MODEL Question, not a technical question. –  Charles Bretana Oct 26 '09 at 19:16
4  
I think you mean if (!DataExists). –  Sarah Vessels Oct 26 '09 at 19:20
70  
This is an architectural question and is perfectly appropriate. The OP's question is valid regardless of the business problem it is trying to solve. –  joseph.ferris Oct 26 '09 at 19:21
2  
This question has already been sufficiently answered. I think this is a very interesting question. –  John Scipione Oct 27 '09 at 1:23
    
'getUser()' should return null. 'getCurrentUserInfo()' or 'getCurrentPermissions()', OTOH, would be more revealing questions -- they should return a non-null answer object regardless of who/ or whether anyone is logged in. –  Thomas W May 3 '13 at 2:46

26 Answers 26

up vote 131 down vote accepted

Returning null is usually the best idea if you intend to indicate that no data is available.

An empty object implies data has been returned, whereas returning null clearly indicates that nothing has been returned.

Additionally, returning a null will result in a null exception if you attempt to access members in the object, which can be useful for highlighting buggy code - attempting to access a member of nothing makes no sense. Accessing members of an empty object will not fail meaning bugs can go undiscovered.

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15  
You should be throwing an exception, not swallowing the problem and returning null. At a minimum, you should log this and then continue. –  Chris Ballance Oct 26 '09 at 18:50
86  
@Chris: I disagree. If the code clearly documents that the return value is null, it's perfectly acceptable to return null if no result is found to match your criteria. Throwing an exception should be your LAST choice, not your FIRST one. –  Mike Hofer Oct 26 '09 at 18:53
10  
@Chris: On what basis do you decide this? Adding logging to the equation certainly seems excessive. Let the consuming code decide what--if anything--should be done in the case of no user. As with my previous comment, there's absolutely no issue with returning a value that is universally defined as "no data". –  Adam Robinson Oct 26 '09 at 18:53
11  
I'm a little baffled that a Microsoft developer believes that "returning null" equates to "swallowing the problem." If memory serves, there are tons methods in the Framework where methods null is returned if there's nothing that matches the caller's request. Is that "swallowing the problem?" –  Mike Hofer Oct 26 '09 at 19:01
3  
Last but not least there would be bool GetUserById(Guid userId, out UserEntity result) - which I would prefer to the "null" return-value, and which isn't as extreme as throwing an exception. It allows beautiful null-free code like if(GetUserById(x,u)) { ... }. –  Marcel Jackwerth Oct 27 '09 at 3:44

It depends on what makes the most sense for your case.

Does it make sense to return null, e.g. "no such user exists"?

Or does it make sense to create a default user? This makes the most sense when you can safely assume that if a user DOESN'T exist, the calling code intends for one to exist when they ask for it.

Or does it make sense to throw an exception (a la "FileNotFound") if the calling code is demanding a user with an invalid ID?

However - from a separation of concerns/SRP standpoint, the first two are more correct. And technically the first is the most correct (but only by a hair) - GetUserById should only be responsible for one thing - getting the user. Handling its own "user does not exist" case by returning something else could be a violation of SRP. Separating into a different check - bool DoesUserExist(id) would be appropriate if you do choose to throw an exception.

Based on extensive comments below: if this is an API-level design question, this method could be analogous to "OpenFile" or "ReadEntireFile". We are "opening" a user from some repository and hydrating the object from the resultant data. An exception could be appropriate in this case. It might not be, but it could be.

All approaches are acceptable - it just depends, based on the larger context of the API/application.

share|improve this answer
    
@anon why the DV? –  Rex M Oct 26 '09 at 18:48
    
Someone voted you down and I voted you back up, since this doesn't seem like a bad answer to me; except: I wouldn't ever throw an exception when finding no user in a method like the one the poster gives. If finding no user implies an invalid ID or some such exception-worthy problem, that should happen higher up -- the throwing method needs to know more about where that ID came from, etc. –  Jacob Mattison Oct 26 '09 at 18:50
    
(I'm guessing the downvote was an objection to the idea of throwing an exception in a circumstance like this.) –  Jacob Mattison Oct 26 '09 at 18:51
1  
Agreed until your last point. There's no violation of SRP by returning a value that is universally defined as "no data". That's like stating that a SQL database should return an error if a where clause produces no results. While an Exception is a valid design choice (though one that would irritate me as a consumer), it's not any "more correct" than returning null. And no, I'm not the DV. –  Adam Robinson Oct 26 '09 at 18:51
2  
@Charles: You're answering the question "should an exception be thrown at some point", but the question is "should this function throw the exception". The correct answer is "maybe", not "yes". –  Adam Robinson Oct 26 '09 at 19:35

Personally, I use NULL. It makes clear that there is no data to return. But there are cases when a Null Object may be usefull.

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6  
+1 for the null objects reference –  Austin Salonen Oct 26 '09 at 18:56
    
And those useful cases are......... –  Subby Jul 29 at 13:25

If your return type is an array then return an empty array otherwise return null.

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Is 0 items in a list the same as list unassigned at this time? –  AnthonyWJones Oct 26 '09 at 18:58
3  
0 items in a list is not the same as null. It allows you to use it in foreach statements and linq queries without worrying for NullReferenceException. –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 26 '09 at 19:06
2  
I am surprised this hasn't been upvoted more. This seems like a pretty reasonable guideline to me. –  sassyboy Aug 30 '12 at 12:18

You should throw an exception (only) if a specific contract is broken.
In your specific example, asking for a UserEntity based on a known Id, it would depend on the fact if missing (deleted) users are an expected case. If so, then return null but if it is not an expected case then throw an exception.
Note that if the function was called UserEntity GetUserByName(string name) it would probably not throw but return null. In both cases returning an empty UserEntity would be unhelpful.

For strings, arrays and collections the situation is usually different. I remember some guideline form MS that methods should accept null as an 'empty' list but return collections of zero-length rather than null. The same for strings. Note that you can declare empty arrays: int[] arr = new int[0];

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer. +1. –  Mike Hofer Oct 26 '09 at 20:47
    
Glad you mentioned that strings are different, since Google showed me this when I was deciding whether to return an empty string. –  Noumenon Mar 6 '13 at 7:48

This is a business question, dependent on whether the existence of a user with a specific Guid Id is an expected normal use case for this function, or is it an anomaly that will prevent the application from successfully completing whatever function this method is providing the user object to...

If it's an "exception", in that the absence of a user with that Id will prevent the application from successfully completing whatever function it is doing, (Say we're creating an invoice for a customer we've shipped product to...), then this situation should throw an ArgumentException (or some other custom exception).

If a missing user is ok, (one of the potential normal outcomes of calling this function) then return a null....

EDIT: (to address comment from Adam in another answer)

If the application contains multiple business processes, one or more of which require a User in order to complete successfully, and one or more of which can complete successfully without a user, then the exception should be thrown further up the call stack, closer to where the business processes which require a User are calling this thread of execution. Methods between this method and that point (where the exception is being thrown) should just communicate that no user exists (null, boolean, whatever - this is an implementation detail).

But if all processes within the application require a user, I would still throw the exception in this method...

share|improve this answer
    
-1 to the downvoter, +1 to Charles -- it is entirely a business question and there is no best practice for this. –  Austin Salonen Oct 26 '09 at 18:55
    
It is crossing the streams. Whether or not it is an "error condition" is driven by the business logic. How to handle that is an application architecture decision. The business logic is not going to dictate that a null be returned, just that the requirements are satisfied. If the business is deciding method return types, then they are too involved in the technical aspect of the implementation. –  joseph.ferris Oct 26 '09 at 19:28
    
@joseph, the core principle behind "structured exception handling" is that exceptions should be thrown when methods cannot complete whatever function they were coded to implement. You are right, in that if the business function this method has been coded to implement can be "successfully completed", (whatever that means in the Domain Model), then you don't need to throw an exception, you could return a null, or a boolean "FoundUser" variable, or whatever... How you communicate to the calling method that no user was found then becomes a technical implementation detail. –  Charles Bretana Oct 26 '09 at 19:37

I personally would return null, because that is how I would expect the DAL/Repository layer to act.

If it doesn't exist, don't return anything that could be construed as successfully fetching an object, null works beautifully here.

The most important thing is to be consistant across your DAL/Repos Layer, that way you don't get confused on how to use it.

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Yet another approach involves passing in a callback object or delegate that will operate on the value. If a value is not found, the callback is not called.

public void GetUserById(Guid id, UserCallback callback)
{
    // Lookup user
    if (userFound)
        callback(userEntity);  // or callback.Call(userEntity);
}

This works well when you want to avoid null checks all over your code, and when not finding a value isn't an error. You may also provide a callback for when no objects are found if you need any special processing.

public void GetUserById(Guid id, UserCallback callback, NotFoundCallback notFound)
{
    // Lookup user
    if (userFound)
        callback(userEntity);  // or callback.Call(userEntity);
    else
        notFound(); // or notFound.Call();
}

The same approach using a single object might look like:

public void GetUserById(Guid id, UserCallback callback)
{
    // Lookup user
    if (userFound)
        callback.Found(userEntity);
    else
        callback.NotFound();
}

From a design perspective, I really like this approach, but has the disadvantage of making the call site bulkier in languages that don't readily support first class functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. When you started talking about delegates, I immediately started wondering if Lambda expressions could be used here. –  7wp Nov 8 '09 at 8:31
    
Yup! As I understand it, C# 3.0 and up's lambda syntax is basically syntactic sugar for anonymous delegates. Similarly in Java, without the nice lambda or anonymous delegate syntax, you can simply create an anonymous class. It's a bit uglier, but can be really handy. I suppose these days, my C# example could have used Func<UserEntity> or something like it instead of a named delegate, but the last C# project I was on was still using version 2. –  Marc Nov 8 '09 at 18:30
    
+1 I like this approach. A problem though is that it's not conventional and slightly increases the barrier to entry for a codebase. –  timoxley Nov 11 '09 at 1:18

We use CSLA.NET, and it takes the view that a failed data fetch should return an "empty" object. This is actually quite annoying, as it demands the convention of checking whether obj.IsNew rathern than obj == null.

As a previous poster mentioned, null return values will cause code to fail straight away, reducing the likelihood of stealth problems caused by empty objects.

Personally, I think null is more elegant.

It's a very common case, and I'm surprised that people here seem surprised by it: on any web application, data is often fetched using a querystring parameter, which can obviously be mangled, so requiring that the developer handle incidences of "not found".

You could handle this by:

if (User.Exists(id)) {
  this.User = User.Fetch(id);
} else {
  Response.Redirect("~/notfound.aspx");
}

...but that's an extra call to the database every time, which may be an issue on high-traffic pages. Whereas:

this.User = User.Fetch(id);

if (this.User == null) {
  Response.Redirect("~/notfound.aspx");
}

...requires only one call.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 agreed....... –  7wp Dec 23 '09 at 19:37

I'd say return null instead of an empty object.

But the specific instance that you have mentioned here, you are searching for an user by user id, which is sort of the key to that user, in that case I'd probably want to to throw an exception if no user instance instance is found.

This is the rule I generally follow:

  • If no result found on a find by primary key operation, throw ObjectNotFoundException.
  • If no result found on a find by any other criteria, return null.
  • If no result found on a find by a non-key criteria that may return a multiple objects return an empty collection.
share|improve this answer

It will vary based on context, but I will generally return null if I'm looking for one particular object (as in your example) and return an empty collection if I'm looking for a set of objects but there are none.

If you've made a mistake in your code and returning null leads to null pointer exceptions, then the sooner you catch that the better. If you return an empty object, initial use of it may work, but you may get errors later.

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Why this answer was voted down? –  Kamarey Oct 26 '09 at 18:57
    
+1 I was questioning the same logic you are saying here, which is why i posted the question to see what others opinions about this would be –  7wp Oct 26 '09 at 18:58

The best in this case return "null" in a case there no a such user. Also make your method static.

Edit:

Usually methods like this are members of some "User" class and don't have an access to its instance members. In this case the method should be static, otherwise you must create an instance of "User" and then call GetUserById method which will return another "User" instance. Agree this is confusing. But if GetUserById method is member of some "DatabaseFactory" class - no problem to leave it as an instance member.

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Can I ask why I would want to make my method static? What if I want to use Dependency Injection ? –  7wp Oct 26 '09 at 19:13
    
See edit. (hate this min 15 chars comments:) ) –  Kamarey Oct 26 '09 at 19:15
    
Ok now I get your logic. But I stick with the Repository pattern, and I like to use dependency injection for my repositories therefore I can't use static methods. But +1 for suggesting to return null :) –  7wp Oct 26 '09 at 19:21

I personally return a default instance of the object. The reason is that I expect the method to return zero to many or zero to one (depending on the method's purpose). The only reason that it would be an error state of any kind, using this approach, is if the method returned no object(s) and was always expected to (in terms of a one to many or singular return).

As to the assumption that this is a business domain question - I just do not see it from that side of the equation. Normalization of return types is a valid application architecture question. At the very least, it is subject for standardization in coding practices. I doubt that there is a business user who is going to say "in scenario X, just give them a null".

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+1 I like the alternative view of the problem. So basically you are saying whichever approach I choose should be fine as long as the method is consistent throughout the application? –  7wp Oct 26 '09 at 19:33
1  
That is my belief. I think consistency is extremely important. If you do things multiple ways in multiple places, it introduces a higher risk for new bugs. We personally have gone with the default object approach, because it works well with the Essence pattern that we use in our domain model. We have a single generic extension method that we can test against all domain objects to tell us if it is populated or not, so that we know that any DO can be tested with a call of objectname.IsDefault() - avoiding any equality checks directly. –  joseph.ferris Oct 26 '09 at 20:06

In our Business Objects we have 2 main Get methods:

To keep things simple in the context or you question they would be:

// Returns null if user does not exist
public UserEntity GetUserById(Guid userId)
{
}

// Returns a New User if user does not exist
public UserEntity GetNewOrExistingUserById(Guid userId)
{
}

The first method is used when getting specific entities, the second method is used specifically when adding or editing entities on web pages.

This enables us to have the best of both worlds in the context where they are used.

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I prefer null, since it's compatible with the null-coalescing operator (??).

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I'm a french IT student, so excuse my poor english. In our classes we are being told that such a method should never return null, nor an empty object. The user of this method is supposed to check first that the object he is looking for exists before trying to get it.

Using Java, we are asked to add a assert exists(object) : "You shouldn't try to access an object that doesn't exist"; at the beginning of any method that could return null, to express the "precondition" (I don't know what is the word in english).

IMO this is really not easy to use but that's what I'm using, waiting for something better.

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1  
Thanks you for your answer. But I dislike the idea of checking first if it exists. The reason is that generates an additional query to the database. In a application that is being accessed by millions of people in a day this can result in dramatic performance loss. –  7wp Oct 28 '09 at 20:51
1  
One benefit is that the check for existence is appropriately abstract: if (userExists) is slightly more readable, closer to the problem domain, & less 'computery' than: if (user == null) –  timoxley Nov 11 '09 at 1:23

I typically return null. It provides a quick and easy mechanism to detect if something screwed up without throwing exceptions and using tons of try/catch all over the place.

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For collection types I would return an Empty Collection, for all other types I prefer using the NullObject patterns for returning an object that implements the same interface as that of the returning type. for details about the pattern check out link text

Using the NullObject pattern this would be :-

public UserEntity GetUserById(Guid userId)

{ //Imagine some code here to access database.....

 //Check if data was returned and return a null if none found
 if (!DataExists)
    return new NullUserEntity(); //Should I be doing this here instead? return new UserEntity();  
 else
    return existingUserEntity;

}

class NullUserEntity: IUserEntity { public string getFirstName(){ return ""; } ...}
share|improve this answer

To put what others have said in a pithier manner...

Exceptions are for Exceptional circumstances

If this method is pure data access layer, I would say that given some parameter that gets included in a select statement, it would expect that I may not find any rows from which to build an object, and therefore returning null would be acceptable as this is data access logic.

On the other hand, if I expected my parameter to reflect a primary key and I should only get one row back, if I got more than one back I would throw an exception. 0 is ok to return null, 2 is not.

Now, if I had some login code that checked against an LDAP provider then checked against a DB to get more details and I expected those should be in sync at all times, I might toss the exception then. As others said, it's business rules.

Now I'll say that is a general rule. There are times where you may want to break that. However, my experience and experiments with C# (lots of that) and Java(a bit of that) has taught me that it is much more expensive performance wise to deal with exceptions than to handle predictable issues via conditional logic. I'm talking to the tune of 2 or 3 orders of magnitude more expensive in some cases. So, if it's possible your code could end up in a loop, then I would advise returning null and testing for it.

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Forgive my pseudo-php/code.

I think it really depends on the intended use of the result.

If you intend to edit/modify the return value and save it, then return an empty object. That way, you can use the same function to populate data on a new or existing object.

Say I have a function that takes a primary key and an array of data, fills the row with data, then saves the resulting record to the db. Since I'm intending to populate the object with my data either way, it can be a huge advantage to get an empty object back from the getter. That way, I can perform identical operations in either case. You use the result of the getter function no matter what.

Example:

function saveTheRow($prim_key, $data) {
    $row = getRowByPrimKey($prim_key);

    // Populate the data here

    $row->save();
}

Here we can see that the same series of operations manipulates all records of this type.

However, if the ultimate intent of the return value is to read and do something with the data, then I would return null. This way, I can very quickly determine if there was no data returned and display the appropriate message to the user.

Usually, I'll catch exceptions in my function that retrieves the data (so I can log error messages, etc...) then return null straight from the catch. It generally doesn't matter to the end user what the problem is, so I find it best to encapsulate my error logging/processing directly in the function that gets the data. If you're maintaining a shared codebase in any large company this is especially beneficial because you can force proper error logging/handling on even the laziest programmer.

Example:

function displayData($row_id) {
    // Logging of the error would happen in this function
    $row = getRow($row_id);
    if($row === null) {
        // Handle the error here
    }

    // Do stuff here with data
}

function getRow($row_id) {
 $row = null;
 try{
     if(!$db->connected()) {
   throw excpetion("Couldn't Connect");
  }

  $result = $db->query($some_query_using_row_id);

  if(count($result) == 0 ) {
   throw new exception("Couldn't find a record!");
  }

  $row = $db->nextRow();

 } catch (db_exception) {
  //Log db conn error, alert admin, etc...
  return null; // This way I know that null means an error occurred
 }
 return $row;
}

That's my general rule. It's worked well so far.

share|improve this answer

If the case of the user not being found comes up often enough, and you want to deal with that in various ways depending on circumstance (sometimes throwing an exception, sometimes substituting an empty user) you could also use something close to F#'s Option or Haskell's Maybe type, which explicitly seperates the 'no value' case from 'found something!'. The database access code could look like this:

public Option<UserEntity> GetUserById(Guid userId)
{
 //Imagine some code here to access database.....

 //Check if data was returned and return a null if none found
 if (!DataExists)
    return Option<UserEntity>.Nothing; 
 else
    return Option.Just(existingUserEntity);
}

And be used like this:

Option<UserEntity> result = GetUserById(...);
if (result.IsNothing()) {
    // deal with it
} else {
    UserEntity value = result.GetValue();
}

Unfortunately, everybody seems to roll a type like this of their own.

share|improve this answer

Interesting question and I think there is no "right" answer, since it always depends on the responsibility of your code. Does your method know if no found data is a problem or not? In most cases the answer is "no" and that's why returning null and letting the caller handling he situation is perfect.

Maybe a good approach to distinguish throwing methods from null-returning methods is to find a convention in your team: Methods that say they "get" something should throw an exception if there is nothing to get. Methods that may return null could be named differently, perhaps "Find..." instead.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like the idea to use a uniform naming convention for signaling to the programmer how that function is to be consumed. –  7wp Oct 28 '09 at 21:19
1  
Suddenly I recognize that this is what LINQ does: consider First(...) vs. FirstOrDefault(...) –  Marc Wittke Oct 28 '09 at 22:09

If the object returned is something that can be iterated over, I would return an empty object, so that I don't have to test for null first.

Example:

bool IsAdministrator(User user)
{
    var groupsOfUser = GetGroupsOfUser(user);

    // This foreach would cause a run time exception if groupsOfUser is null.
    foreach (var groupOfUser in groupsOfUser) 
    {
        if (groupOfUser.Name == "Administrators")
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

I tend to

  • return null if the object id doesn't exist when it's not known beforehand whether it should exist.
  • throw if the object id doesn't exist when it should exist.

I differentiate these two scenarios with these three types of methods. First:

Boolean TryGetSomeObjectById(Int32 id, out SomeObject o)
{
    if (InternalIdExists(id))
    {
        o = InternalGetSomeObject(id);

        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Second:

SomeObject FindSomeObjectById(Int32 id)
{
    SomeObject o;

    return TryGetObjectById(id, out o) ? o : null;
}

Third:

SomeObject GetSomeObjectById(Int32 id)
{
    SomeObject o;

    if (!TryGetObjectById(id, out o))
    {
        throw new SomeAppropriateException();
    }

    return o;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You mean out not ref –  Matt Ellen Oct 19 '10 at 11:59
    
@Matt: Yes, sir, I most certainly do! Fixed. –  Johann Gerell Oct 19 '10 at 12:05

More meat to grind: let's say my DAL returns a NULL for GetPersonByID as advised by some. What should my (rather thin) BLL do if it receives a NULL? Pass that NULL on up and let the end consumer worry about it (in this case, an ASP.Net page)? How about having the BLL throw an exception?

The BLL may be being used by ASP.Net and Win App, or another class library - I think it is unfair to expect the end consumer to intrinsically "know" that the method GetPersonByID returns a null (unless null types are used, I guess).

My take (for what it's worth) is that my DAL returns NULL if nothing is found. FOR SOME OBJECTS, that's ok - it could be a 0:many list of things, so not having any things is fine (e.g. a list of favourite books). In this case, my BLL returns an empty list. For most single entity things (e.g. user, account, invoice) if I don't have one, then that's definitely a problem and a throw a costly exception. However, seeing as retrieving a user by a unique identifier that's been previously given by the application should always return a user, the exception is a "proper" exception, as in it's exceptional. The end consumer of the BLL (ASP.Net, f'rinstance) only ever expects things to be hunky-dory, so an Unhandled Exception Handler will be used instead of wrapping every single call to GetPersonByID in a try - catch block.

If there is a glaring problem in my approach, please let me know as I am always keen to learn. As other posters have said, exceptions are costly things, and the "checking first" approach is good, but exceptions should be just that - exceptional.

I'm enjoying this post, lot's of good suggestions for "it depends" scenarios :-)

share|improve this answer
    
And of course, today I've come across a scenario where I'm going to return NULL from my BLL ;-) That said, I could still throw an exception and use try / catch in my consuming class BUT I still have a problem: how does my consuming class know to use a try / catch, similar how do they know to check for NULL? –  Mike Kingscott Nov 5 '09 at 9:25
    
You can document that a method throws an exception via the @throws doctag and you'd document the fact it can return null in the @return doctag. –  timoxley Nov 11 '09 at 1:11

You should be throwing an exception if it is an exceptional circumstance that you call that code with an invalid user ID. If it is NOT an exceptional circumstance, then what you are essentially doing is using a "getter" method to test whether a user exists or not. That is like trying to open a file to see if it exists or not (lets stick to c#/java here) instead of using the exists method, or trying to access dictionary elements and seeing if they exist by looking at the return value instead of using the "contains" method first.

Therefore, it is likely you are after an additional method such as "exists" to first check if there is such a user. Performance of exceptions is definitely not a reason to just not use them at all unless you have genuine performance issues.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm convinced that in this particular case it is better to return a Null. Please see the accepted answer and also read the comments. –  7wp Jan 12 '11 at 13:15
    
Also exceptions should not be thrown for expected cases. Like in my example where it is expected that sometimes the user ID you are looking for may not be found. Because if you use exceptions for expected cases, and those cases happen many times in a short period of time, then the overhead of exception handling can actually ding you a bit in performance. Like say in a long running loop. –  7wp Jan 12 '11 at 13:18

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