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I am certain q in int q[6][4] is of type (**q)[4], ie, pointer to a pointer to an integer array sized 4. But the book I have (I find it dubious!!) says that the int q[][4] part in the function definition void foo(int q[][4]){} is the same as int (*q)[4].I am ambivalent about the book, yet let me present for your consideration some issues that crop up in my mind over this.Your detailed explanation is very much sought.

1) During declaration,is the type of q in int q[][4] the same as in int q[6][4]? Contrary to what the book says, I see q[][4] as nothing but q[0][4] and I feel q is of type (**q)[4],and not (*q)[4].Am I right?What's your take on it?

2) (Most confusing bit) I know passing int *q and int q[] (or int q[4]) is the same in C as the latter reduces to the former.But I have verified from the compiler that int (*q)[5] is not the same type as int (*q)[4], so what is the difference between passing as arguments to a function A) int (*q)[] B)int (*q)[4] and C)int (*q)[5] ? Please be detailed for the answer to this part.

3) How is passing int q[][4] to a function different from passing int q[6][4] in C?Does q reduce to (**q)[4] in both cases?

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@hyde "In C, "array of integers" is basically same thing as "pointer to integer"" - Please, for the love of God, DO NOT TELL THIS WRONG EXPLANATION to beginners!!! Thanks. –  user529758 Apr 28 '13 at 19:19
    
@H2CO3 Please refute that remark of hyde with a rigorous technical explanation, even if it's concise.I really need that.Hyde is indeed both confusing and convincing !! –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 28 '13 at 19:22
    
@SheerFish I just did that in my answer. –  user529758 Apr 28 '13 at 19:22
    
@H2CO3 My question sounds messy and confusing indeed.Hence it has been voted down.But the issue itself is confusing and messy and I didn't have better words to put my point across.Glad that I got good answers –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 28 '13 at 19:40
    
@H2CO3 I misread the types a bit for that deleted comment so it was overall bad, but "in C, array of integers decays to a pointer to integer" is pretty much a more formal way of saying "in C, array of integers is basically same thing as pointer to integer, with a few subtle differences". Before that is understood, IME it's very hard to understand what some actual piece of array/pointer code does, and what the array/pointer differences are. –  hyde Apr 28 '13 at 19:46
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3 Answers 3

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I am certain q in int q[6][4] is of type (**q)[4], ie, pointer to a pointer to an integer array sized 4

No. (The pointer-to-pointer-to-array is very, very far from the truth, specifically.) q is of type int[6][4], i. e. an array of 6 arrays of 4 integers.

When passed to a function, it's only the first (innermost) dimension of an array that decays into a pointer. So, int[6][4] decays into int (*)[4], and so does int[][4].

int (*q)[5] is not the same type as int (*q)[4], so what is the difference between passing as arguments to a function A) int (*q)[] B) int (*q)[4] and C) int (*q)[5]

A) is an incomplete type (pointer to array of any size). You can't dereference it, nor can you perform pointer arithmetic on it.

B) is a pointer to array of 4 ints. C) is a pointer to array of 5 ints.

How is passing int q[][4] to a function different from passing int q[6][4] in C?

Semantically, they mean the same. They both decay into int (*)[4].

Does q reduce to (**q)[4] in both cases?

No, but I've already explained that.

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For the first question, q is an array of array of four integers.

You might want to read about the Clockwise/Spiral Rule. It might actually help you with the second question.

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Please add some details to your answer as you generally do.A lot of guys like me must be having the same confusion that I have tried to mention in this question –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 28 '13 at 19:15
    
@SheerFish c-faq.com if you need details... –  user529758 Apr 28 '13 at 19:17
    
+1 for the rule link –  hyde Apr 28 '13 at 19:21
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I think it's worth mentioning that one needs to be careful using that rule when dealing with multi-dimensional arrays: int *a[2][3] is clearly not an array of pointers to an array of int. –  effeffe Apr 28 '13 at 19:34
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1) During declaration,is the type of q in int q[][4] the same as in int q[6][4]?

Yes. The first dimension is not needed in a function declaration and a multidimensional array in a function declaration has type pointer to an array.

what is the difference between passing as arguments to a function A) int (*q)[] B)int (*q)[4] and C)int (*q)[5] ?

int (*q)[] is a pointer to an array of unknown size. int (*q)[4] is a pointer to int[4] and int (*q)[5] is a pointer to int[5]. They all have different types.

3) How is passing int q[][4] to a function different from passing int q[6][4] in C?Does q reduce to (**q)[4] in both cases?

They are both equivalent to int (*q)[4].

Pleas read 23.1: Multidimensional Arrays and Functions of the c.faq for more details.

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How come q in int q[6][4] pointer to an array? Here q[6] is certainly an array of pointers and hence q is of type pointer to pointer.What's wrong with my argument? –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 28 '13 at 19:19
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@SheerFish No, q isn't an array of pointers, it's an array of arrays (an array of 6 arrays of 4 ints), and it decays into a pointer to array of 4 ints. –  user529758 Apr 28 '13 at 19:20
    
@H2CO3 I meant to say the q[6] part is an array of pointers as it stores the base address of arrays of size 4.And q being the base address of such an array of pointers, is hence of type int (**q)[4].Aint' I right? –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 28 '13 at 19:24
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@SheerFish: It seems my answer didn't help, so I will delete this in a little bit. Please read all the c.faq under Arrays and Pointers and see if that clears up things. –  Jesse Good Apr 28 '13 at 19:44
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Jesse's answer to question 1 is correct considering the context of the title of the question, which specifically asks about int q[][4] vs. int q[6][4] as parameters. And the answer is that they are both actually int (*q)[4] according to the C standard. It would be different if someone were to ask about them as global variable declarations or something. –  newacct Apr 28 '13 at 20:27
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