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split s (Root x lst rst)
 | s < x = let (nlt, nrt) = split s lst in
     (nlt, Root x nrt rst)

Can someone please explain this line? I don't really get the let part.

I tried thinking about it, I have no idea if I got it right: we bind (nlt, nrt), to the result of split s lst; and split s lst itself will be (nlt, Root x nrt rst)

Is that it?

Here's the complete code:

split :: Ord a => a -> Tree a -> (Tree a, Tree a)
split _ Empty = (Empty, Empty)
split s (Root x lst rst)
 | s < x = let (nlt, nrt) = split s lst in
     (nlt, Root x nrt rst)
 | s > x = let (nlt, nrt) = split s rst in
         (Root x lst nlt, nrt)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 42 down vote accepted

we bind (nlt, nrt), to the result of split s lst

Yup - split s lst is a pair, and we're giving the names nlt and nrt to the two elements of the pair.

and split s lst itself will be (nlt, Root x nrt rst)

No, split s (Root x lst rst) (the result of the whole function) will be (nlt, Root x nrt rst).

But what does the whole function do?

split :: Ord a => a -> Tree a -> (Tree a, Tree a)
split _ Empty = (Empty, Empty)
split s (Root x lst rst)
 | s < x = let (nlt, nrt) = split s lst in
     (nlt, Root x nrt rst)
 | s > x = let (nlt, nrt) = split s rst in
         (Root x lst nlt, nrt)

Let's try that on some sample data:

> split 300 (Root 512 (Root 256 (Root 128 Empty Empty) (Root 384 Empty Empty)) Empty)
(Root 256 (Root 128 Empty Empty) Empty,Root 512 (Root 384 Empty Empty) Empty)

So we took a tree that had 512 as its root, and all the items smaller than it in the left subtree, and split it so that the first tree is made up of entries below 300, with those over 300 in the second. That looks like this:

enter image description here

How does the line in question work?

First let's rewrite the code with expanded names:

split :: Ord a => a -> Tree a -> (Tree a, Tree a)
split _ Empty = (Empty, Empty)
split s (Root x left_subtree right_subtree)
 | s < x = let (new_left_tree, new_right_tree) = split s left_subtree in
     (new_left_tree, Root x new_right_tree right_subtree)
 | s > x = let (new_left_tree, new_right_tree) = split s right_subtree in
         (Root x left_subtree new_left_tree, new_right_tree)

The guard |s < x means we're in the case that this x should go on the right.

First we split the left subtree split s left_subtree, givning us a new_left_tree and new_right_tree. The new_left_tree is the stuff that should go left, but the new_right_tree is combined with x and the original right_subtree to make up the bits that go on the right of s.

What can we learn about the function from that?

The right_subtree gets left alone, because s belongs on the left of x, so the function is assuming the tree is already sorted in the sense that in Root x l r, everything in l is below x and everything in r is above x.

The left_subtree gets split, because some of it may be less than s and other bits more than s.

The part of split s left_subtree that now belongs on the right (because it's more than s) is called new_right_tree, and because the whole left_subtree was less than x and the right_subtree, all of the new_right_tree should still be to the left of both x and right_subtree. That's why we make Root x new_right_tree right_subtree to be the right hand answer in the pair (and new_left_tree on the left of the pair).

Here's a before and after diagram:

enter image description here

Why not have more descriptive names then?

Good question. Let's do it:

split :: Ord a => a -> Tree a -> (Tree a, Tree a)
split _ Empty = (Empty, Empty)
split s (Root this below_this above_this)

 | s < this = let (below_this_below_s, below_this_above_s) = split s below_this in
     (below_this_below_s,  Root  this  below_this_above_s  above_this)

 | s > this = let (above_this_below_s, above_this_above_s) = split s above_this in
         (Root  this  below_this above_this_below_s,  above_this_above_s)

OK, I think that answers my question: sometimes descriptive names can be confusing too!

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Thanks a lot Andrew, I can't upvote the answer, I don't have enough reputation. –  macguy Apr 28 '13 at 20:38
    
I just posted the complete split code –  macguy Apr 28 '13 at 20:41
    
Also, I have another question as to what the function actually does: If our "s" element is less than the root x, we return a pair of trees: the first element being the new left tree, and the second one being the old tree (+ swapped left subtree with a new right subtree)? I'm trying to make sense of this, but I can't figure it out. –  macguy Apr 28 '13 at 20:51
5  
It's more dense, but once you get used to it, it's great. I remember starting a project in an OOP language and once I'd written a page or two of helper classes, I thought "hang on a minute - that would've taken me a few lines in Haskell - and indeed it did. :) I had a friend that swore by C, who explained a two program he'd written for a niggly bibliography maintenance task. I wrote a bit of Haskell on the back of an envelope and explained it. "Is that it?" "Yes. Why - is your code roughly 10 times as long?" "Yes.". –  AndrewC Apr 28 '13 at 21:28
1  
@macguy We can get closer using Data.Tree.Pretty. See the section Prettier in this answer –  AndrewC Apr 28 '13 at 21:32

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