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Below are the instructions to the program, the title of this question is the actual title given in my homework.

Input: A decimal number is given
Output: Print given number in a 32-bit format
Limit: Given number must be in the range[0,1000000]

I wrote this C code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
int main()
{
float decimalNum,decimalPart;
int wholeNum,i,j,temp;
printf("Write a number between 0 and 1000000 \n");
scanf ("%f", &decimalNum);
printf("The number you wrote is %.f \n",decimalNum);
wholeNum=(int)decimalNum;
decimalPart=decimalNum-wholeNum;
printf("The whole number is %d, and the decimal part is %.f \n",wholeNum,decimalPart);
for(temp = wholeNum; temp>0;)
{
printf("The remainder of %d when divided by 2 is %d\n",temp,temp%2);

temp=temp/2;

}
return 0;
}

it`s still not finished, but the output is(for 5678.098765456):

Write a number between 0 and 1000000
5678.098765456
The number you wrote is 5678
The whole number is 5678, and the decimal part is 0.
The remainder of 5678 when divided by 2 is 0
The remainder of 2839 when divided by 2 is 1
The remainder of 1419 when divided by 2 is 1
The remainder of 709 when divided by 2 is 1
The remainder of 354 when divided by 2 is 0
The remainder of 177 when divided by 2 is 1
The remainder of 88 when divided by 2 is 0
The remainder of 44 when divided by 2 is 0
The remainder of 22 when divided by 2 is 0
The remainder of 11 when divided by 2 is 1
The remainder of 5 when divided by 2 is 1
The remainder of 2 when divided by 2 is 0
The remainder of 1 when divided by 2 is 1

As far as I know, the program is supposed to read the bits backwards to form the 32-bit string. Does anyone know how this can be done? If you have any suggestions or think my code is totally wrong, feel free to correct it.

share|improve this question
    
The only question you have asked is “Does anyone know how this can be done?” The answer to that is yes, somebody knows how this can be done. You should reconsider what question you really want to ask. Two other points: If you change “%.f” in your printf statements to “%f”, it will print some decimal places instead of just the integer portion. And your program appears to be correctly printing the bits of the integer part, in order from low bits to high bits. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 29 '13 at 0:27
    
Actually, the output is supposed to be 32-bit strings, e.g. 10111010010101111001010111011100. I tried changing the "%.f" into "%f" and the output remains still the same as shown above. –  user2329422 Apr 29 '13 at 17:51

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