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I'm trying to get an existing ActorRef with ActorFor or create a new one if it does not exists. I have the following code but it doesn't seem to work as expected. .isTerminated() is always true.

ActorSystem system = ActorSystem.create("System");

            ActorRef subscriberCandidate = system.actorFor("akka://System/user/"+name);

            if (subscriberCandidate.isTerminated())
            {
                ActorRef subscriber = system.actorOf(new Props(new UntypedActorFactory() {
                      public UntypedActor create() {
                        return new Sub(name,link);
                      }
                    }), name);
                System.out.println(subscriber.path().toString() + " created");
            }
            else
                System.out.println("already exists"); 

What am I missing here? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
A good explanation how to create or retrieve an actor on demand can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/10766187/… The implementation is in Scala and not Java, but it explains the general concept very good. –  Markus Jura Oct 15 '13 at 22:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on the given code you are calling actorFor to look up a non-existent actor. The actor doesn't exist until actorOf is called.

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Get-or-create can only be performed by the parent of the designated actor, since only that parent can create the actor if it does not exist, and only the parent can do so consistently (i.e. without race conditions). Within an actor you can do

// assuming a String name like "fred" or "barney", i.e. without "/"
final Option<ActorRef> child = child(name);
if (child.isDefined())
  return child.get();
else
  return getContext().actorOf(..., name);

Do not do this at the top-level (i.e. using system.actorOf), because then you cannot be sure who “wins” in requesting creation and also relying on the user guardian is not good a good supervision strategy.

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Do you mean that I should create actors like the following? Props superprops = new Props(Supervisor.class); ActorRef supervisor = system.actorOf(superprops, "supervisor"); ActorRef child = (ActorRef) Await.result(ask(supervisor, new Props(Child.class), 5000), timeout); –  Hako Apr 29 '13 at 20:49
    
The preferred way is to just create the supervisor and put all the code for the rest inside of it: the supervisor creates its children once ot needs them, and it knows the Props for them so that it can have a matching supervisorStrategy. In your example ask it for the specific function (e.g. by name). –  Roland Kuhn Apr 30 '13 at 5:07

Change your lookup to be:

system.actorFor("/user/" + name)

You don't need the "akka://System" part if this is a local actor you are looking up. This is assuming that this actor was already started up elsewhere in your code though. If not it won't work.

share|improve this answer
    
even the akka documentation says this is how you get a hold of an actor, but this does not work for me at all. If I send an identity message to the code you types I, it gets sent to dead letters –  Adrian Jul 25 '13 at 21:06
    
however, this worked: val path=system/"user"/name system.actorSelection(path) –  Adrian Jul 25 '13 at 21:21
1  
actorFor has been deprecated in the latest version of Akka in favor of actorSelection. You can send messages to an ActorSelection like you would an ActorRefor if its only for a single actor you can send an Identify message to it in order to get at the ActorRef –  cmbaxter Jul 26 '13 at 0:41

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