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//I made these 2 structs

struct Book1
{
    int genre;  
    int year;
    char* author;       
};

struct Book2
{
    int genre;
    char* author;
    int year;           
};

//in my main function I did 'sizeof()' for both structures. //for some reason, Book1 had a size of 16 bytes, but Book2 had a size of 24 bytes //why does this happen? //by the way, this is on a 64-bit windows machine, complied using Visual Studio 2012

int main(void)   
{

    int test1 = sizeof(struct Book1);   
    int test2 = sizeof(struct Book2);   


    return 0;
}
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Book1 had a size of 16 bytes, but Book2 had a size of 24 bytes //why does this happen?

Alignment and padding.

The char* member has a size of 8 bytes, and the compiler wants to align it on an 8-byte boundary.

With the two int members - each of size 4 - next to each other before the char*, that is naturally achieved when the entire structure is aligned to 8 bytes and no padding is inserted.

With one int before, and one after the char*, the compiler inserts 4 bytes of padding between the first int and the char* to have the latter 8-byte aligned if the structure is 8-byte aligned, and a further 4 bytes of padding before or after (more likely) the second int member to have the structure size a multiple of the largest alignment required by one of its members (which is the 8-byte requirement of the char*).

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thank you for clarifying, that's very interesting. – Harry K. Apr 28 '13 at 22:17

The reason for the different sizes is because of padding. On a 64bit machine, you're looking at 8x8 addresses. int is typically, though not always, a 32 bit value. You can pack the two int values into a single 64 bits space. So the following structure uses two 64bit blocks...

struct Book1
{
    int genre;  
    int year;
    char* author;       
};

Conversely, your second structure places the pointer between the two ints and they cannot be packed together into a single 64 bit block, so you have to set aside 8 bytes for the first 8, 8 bytes for the pointer and 8 bytes for the second int to retain the packing rules for a 64 bit machine.

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The structs are being padded to align the data elements. You can disable padding via

#pragma pack(push, 1)
// your struct here
#pragma pack(pop)

But you usually don't want to do this since misaligned data may require multiple memory reads.

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padding issue, on 64bit architecture, usually alignment is 64bits, which is 8bytes.

    struct Book1          //16bytes
    {
        int genre;        //4 bytes
        int year;         //4 bytes
        char* author;     //8 bytes
    };

    struct Book2          //24 bytes
    {
        int genre;        //4 bytes
                          //4 bytes, padding
        char* author;     //8 bytes
        int year;         //4 bytes
                          //4 bytes, padding
    };
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