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We see a gradual transfer of data from system to graphics memory with each OpenGL or Direct3D iteration, first with textures, then with vertices, now even with shaders. Why didn't they make it possible to map whatever you need on VRAM and get done with it, if that's the method to get performance? Is it too important to separate graphics memory's Shaders from say, graphics memory's Vertices?

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closed as not constructive by Chris Tavares, genpfault, Nicol Bolas, j riv, Andreas Brinck Apr 30 '13 at 5:47

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We see a gradual transfer of data from system to graphics memory with each OpenGL or Direct3D iteration

That's not what we see. What we see is an evolution of the graphics API to bring their abstract concepts closer to what the hardware actually does. Without having concepts like buffer objects, shaders, etc. in the API everything the API does is smokes and mirrors. Let's take old and dusted immediate mode for example. The very first GPUs actually did work like that. But every GPU built after 2000 expects batches of data to be rendered. Doing immediate mode calls requires the OpenGL implementation to build a vertex array in-situ, batching the vertices into a single draw call at the glEnd. The changes in the API reflect the changes in the hardware and the way we're working with it.

now even with shaders

What do you mean by that? Do you refer to separable shader objects? That has nothing to do with "moving them around".

Why didn't they make it possible to map whatever you need on VRAM

STOP! OpenGL doesn't define VRAM. OpenGL only defines client memory and server memory. And a very, very abstract object model in which memory is something opaque and outside of direct access. Heck, using OpenGL buffer objects doesn't even warrant for things to be placed in VRAM at all. It's completely abstract!

The distinction is there because that's how the underlying architecture was designed. The gradual changes you can see in the graphics APIs are due to the gradual changes in hardware design.

Placing textures in graphics memory always made sense, but putting vertex data there was invented only later. Then the concept got expanded on generalized data objects (it got called "superbuffers" for some time).

Is it too important to separate graphics memory's Shaders from say, graphics memory's Vertices?

Of what separation do you write there? Shaders are abstract objects, VBOs are abstract storage, and textures are abstract as well.

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