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I want to load list in list from text file. I went through many examples but no solution. This is what I want to do I am new bee to python

def main()
    mainlist = [[]]
    infile = open('listtxt.txt','r')
    for line in infile:
        mainlist.append(line)

    infile.close()

    print mainlist

`[[],['abc','def', 1],['ghi','jkl',2]]`

however what I want is something like this

[['abc','def',1],['ghi','jkl',2]]

my list contains

'abc','def',1
'ghi','jkl',2
'mno','pqr',3

what I want is when I access the list print mainlist[0] should return

'abc','def',1

any help will be highly appreciated Thanks,

share|improve this question
    
For your expected output : [['abc','def',1],['ghi','jkl',2]], print mainlist[0] will return ['abc','def',1] –  Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 28 '13 at 23:44
    
everything is fine, you just have an extra bracket to start your mainlist! change mainlist = [[]] to mainlist = [] and then print mainlist[0] will return ['abc','def',1] –  Ryan Saxe Apr 28 '13 at 23:51

5 Answers 5

It seems to me that you could do this as:

from ast import literal_eval
with open('listtxt.txt') as f:
    mainlist = [list(literal_eval(line)) for line in f]

This is the easist way to make sure that the types of the elements are preserved. e.g. a line like:

"foo","bar",3

will be transformed into 2 strings and an integer. Of course, the lines themselves need to be formatted as a python tuple... and this probably isn't the fastest approach due to it's generality and simplicity.

share|improve this answer
    
This is it, script above worked. The way I wanted it this is perfect, Thank-you very much BTW same thing I could have done very quickly using array in C# or delphi etc. –  user2330294 May 1 '13 at 2:57

Maybe something like this.

mainlist = []
infile = open('listtxt.txt','r')
for line in infile:
    mainlist.append(line.strip().split(','))

infile.close()

print mainlist
share|improve this answer
    
out put of above ["'abc','def',1", "'ghi','jkl',2", "'mno','pqr',3"] –  user2330294 May 1 '13 at 1:04
    
No it's not, split return a list. infile = ["'abc','def',1", "'ghi','jkl',2", "'mno','pqr',3"] I tried it, the output is [["'abc'", "'def'", '1'], ["'ghi'", "'jkl'", '2'], ["'mno'", "'pqr'", '3']] –  marcadian May 1 '13 at 18:14

You're initializing mainlist with an empty list as first element, rather than as an empty list itself. Change:

mainlist = [[]]

to

mainlist = []
share|improve this answer
    
funny thing is when I create list manually everything work fine def main(): mainlist = [['abc','def',1],['ghi','jkl',2]] print mainlist[0][0] output is 'abc' why samething not happen when I load list from text file It seems I am missing some point –  user2330294 May 1 '13 at 1:18

Try something like this:

mainlist=[]

with open('listtxt.txt') as f:
    for line in f:
        mainlist.append(line.strip())

print mainlist[0]

Output:

'abc','def',1
share|improve this answer
    
Is that really the output? Shouldn't there be [ and ] in there somewhere? (or am I mis-reading the question here ...) –  mgilson Apr 28 '13 at 23:47
    
@mgilson stackoverflow.com/questions/16269179/… –  Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 28 '13 at 23:51
    
Yeah, I saw that, but even then somehow you had some magic type conversion happening. '1' turned into an integer ... –  mgilson Apr 28 '13 at 23:52
    
@mgilson Actually my mainlist is something like this : ["'abc','def',1", "'ghi','jkl',2", "'mno','pqr',3"]. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 28 '13 at 23:58

I'd try something like:

with open('listtxt.txt', 'r') as f:
    mainlist = [line for line in f]
share|improve this answer
    
out put of above ["'abc','def',1", "'ghi','jkl',2", "'mno','pqr',3"] why there are double quotes –  user2330294 May 1 '13 at 1:04
    
@user2330294 your input has quotes which are part of the string –  Daenyth May 1 '13 at 14:31

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