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The following code gives me a segmentation fault:

bool primeNums[100000000]; // index corresponds to number, t = prime, f = not prime

for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
{
    primeNums[i] = false;
}

However, if I change the array declaration to be dynamic:

bool *primeNums = new bool[100000000];

I don't get a seg-fault. I have a general idea of why this is: in the first example, the memory's being put on the stack while in the dynamic case it's being put on the heap.

Could you explain this in more detail?

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You've already pointed to a large part of the reason. The other part is that in a typical case, stack size is relatively limited -- a few megabytes or so. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 29 '13 at 1:18

4 Answers 4

bool primeNums[100000000];

used out all your stack space, therefore, you will get segmentation fault since there is not enough stack space to allocate a static array with huge size.

dynamic array is allocated on the heap, therefore, not that easy to get segmentation fault. Dynamic arrays are created using new in C++, it will call operator new to allocate memory then call constructor to initialize the allocated memory.

More information about how operator new works is quoted from the standard below [new.delete.single]:

Required behavior:

Return a nonnull pointer to suitably aligned storage (3.7.3), or else throw a bad_alloc exception. This requirement is binding on a replacement version of this function.

Default behavior:

— Executes a loop: Within the loop, the function first attempts to allocate the requested storage. Whether the attempt involves a call to the Standard C library function malloc is unspecified.

— Returns a pointer to the allocated storage if the attempt is successful. Otherwise, if the last argument to set_new_handler() was a null pointer, throw bad_alloc.

— Otherwise, the function calls the current new_handler (18.4.2.2). If the called function returns, the loop repeats.

— The loop terminates when an attempt to allocate the requested storage is successful or when a called new_handler function does not return.

So using dynamic array with new, when there is not enough space, it will throw bad_alloc by default, in this case, you will see an exception not a segmentation fault, when your array size is huge, it is better to use dynamic array or standard containers such as vectors.

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4  
The 'heap' is (essentially) all the free RAM in the box. The 'stack' is just a small part the system sets aside to keep the list of function calls being made and a couple local variables for each function. When you call into a function, where you called from and you local variables are added to the list on the stack. When a function returns its local variables and where called from are removed from the list (after going back). It is unreasonable for the system to expect a program to make a million nested function calls or have a million local variables or some combination of the same. –  John Apr 29 '13 at 1:23
    
@John Thanks for the nice explanation. –  taocp Apr 29 '13 at 1:24
bool primeNums[100000000];

This declaration allocates memory in the stack space. The stack space is a memory block allocated when your application is launched. It is usually in the range of a few kilobyes or megabytes (it depends on the language implementation, compiler, os, and other factors).

This space is used to store local and static variables so you have to be gentle and don't overuse it. Because this is a stack, all allocations are continuos (no empty space between allocations).

bool *primeNums = new bool[100000000];

In this case the memory is allocated is the heap. This is space free where large new chucks of memory can be allocated.

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Some compilers or operating systems limit the size of the stack. On windows the default is 1 MB but it can be changed.

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in the first case you allocate memory on stack:

bool primeNums[100000000]; // put 100000000 bools on stack

for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
{
    primeNums[i] = false;
}

however this is allocation on heap:

bool *primeNums = new bool[100000000]; // put 100000000 bools in the heap

and since stack is (very) limited this is the reason for segfault

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