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Is it possible to avoid floating point overflow?

If so, how?

If not, what if you use your own representation of a floating point number- is there some different way you can create to represent it where you don't have to worry about overflow?

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Are you talking about some language or about floating points in general? –  Alexey Apr 29 '13 at 3:00
    
In general: set an fp trap. How this is done is in part dependent on the architecture of the system. Ususally, a SIGFPE is raised by the system hardware when a trap is enabled and fp exceptions like overflow occur. See this for a discussion of signals, SIGFPE in the POSIX world: man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/signal.2.html –  jim mcnamara Apr 29 '13 at 3:06
    
I mean in general. So, if I set an fp trap, that just lets me know that there is an overflow, right? Is there anyway to somehow still represent the overflowed number, even if I'm required to write my own data structure or something? –  Mastid Apr 29 '13 at 3:13
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2 Answers

Is it possible to avoid floating point overflow?

It depends what you are trying to do.

If so, how?

It depends what you are trying to do.

If not, what if you use your own representation of a floating point number- is there some different way you can create to represent it where you don't have to worry about overflow?

Yes. But it's not simple, and you would be better off using an existing library. See this stackoverflow question for some examples.

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Yes, it is possible to avoid floating-point overflow. However, the appropriate method for doing so depends on your application. In an application where the ranges of the numbers are known in advance, it may be appropriate to design calculations that do not encounter overflow. If an application must handle general calculations that it cannot easily control, it may be appropriate to test for overflow at certain points, adjust the numbers to avoid it, and retain additional information to correct the results later. Or it may be appropriate to design one’s own system for floating-point arithmetic.

You would have to specify more information about the requirements before a recommendation can be made. This is somewhat like asking “Is it possible to travel off road?” The answer is of course yes, but nobody can tell you whether an all-terrain vehicle, a boat, or a plane is the best solution unless they know where you want to go.

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