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I am working on a grade book project that has 5 students that I want to read the names in for and then with an inner loop grab 4 grades for each student. Something is not working on this loop. This what I am getting:

Please enter the name for student 1: Dave
Please enter the grade number 1 for Dave: 100
Please enter the grade number 2 for Dave: 100
Please enter the grade number 3 for Dave: 100
Please enter the grade number 4 for Dave: 10
Please enter the name for student 2: James
Please enter the grade number 5 for James: 100
Please enter the name for student 3: Sam
Please enter the grade number 5 for Sam: 100
Please enter the name for student 4: Jack
Please enter the grade number 5 for Jack: 100
Please enter the name for student 5: Mike
Please enter the grade number 5 for Mike: 100

It should grab 4 grades before it jumps to the next student. I have not been able to figure this out for the last couple hours. Here is the code I have so far:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

const int STUDENTS = 5; //holds how many students we have
const int SCORES = 4;

void getNames(string names[], double student1[SCORES], double student2[SCORES],
          double student3[SCORES], double student4[SCORES], double student5[SCORES],            int SCORES, int STUDENTS);

int main()
{
    string names[STUDENTS]  = {""};
    char grades[STUDENTS]   = {""};
    double student1[SCORES] = {0};
    double student2[SCORES] = {0};
    double student3[SCORES] = {0};
    double student4[SCORES] = {0};
    double student5[SCORES] = {0};

getNames(names, student1, student2, student3, student4, student5, SCORES,  STUDENTS);


//  Make sure we place the end message on a new line
    cout << endl;

//  The following is system dependent.  It will only work on Windows
    system("PAUSE");

    return 0;
}

void getNames(string names[], double student1[SCORES], double student2[SCORES],
          double student3[SCORES], double student4[SCORES], double student5[SCORES],     int SCORES, int STUDENTS)
{
     for (int i = 0; i < STUDENTS; i++)
     {
         cout << "Please enter the name for student " << i+1 << ": ";
         cin >> names[i];
         cout << endl;

         if (i == 0)
         {
            int count1 = 0;
            for (count1; count1 < SCORES; count1++)
            {
                cout << "Please enter the grade number " << count1+1 << " for " << names[i] <<": ";
                cin >> student1[count1];
                cout << endl;
            }
         }
         else if (i == 1)
         {
            int count2 = 0; 
            for (count2; count2 < SCORES; count2++);
            {
                cout << "Please enter the grade number " << count2+1 << " for " << names[i] <<": ";
                cin >> student2[count2];
                cout << endl;
            }
         }
         else if (i == 2)
         {
            int count3 = 0; 
            for (count3; count3 < SCORES; count3++);
            {
                cout << "Please enter the grade number " << count3+1 << " for " << names[i] <<": ";
                cin >> student3[count3];
                cout << endl;
            }
         }
         else if (i == 3)
         {
            int count4 = 0; 
            for (count4; count4 < SCORES; count4++);
            {
                cout << "Please enter the grade number " << count4+1 << " for " << names[i] <<": ";
                cin >> student4[count4];
                cout << endl;
            }
         }
         else
         {
            int count5 = 0; 
            for (count5; count5 < SCORES; count5++);
            {
                cout << "Please enter the grade number " << count5+1 << " for " << names[i] <<": ";
                cin >> student5[count5];
                cout << endl;
            }
         }

     }
}

Thanks for any help on this!

share|improve this question
2  
Why do you have arrays student1, 2, 3, 4, 5 instead of an array of students? Especially since you KNOW about arrays... (Yes, you can have arrays of arrays, arrays of structs, whatever you want) –  Patashu Apr 29 '13 at 5:14
    
Why even have the loop if you're going to have that big if/else inside of it? –  Carl Norum Apr 29 '13 at 5:14
3  
I believe you have not yet grasped the concept of a loop. –  Ed S. Apr 29 '13 at 5:15
    
the project requires me to have five arrays of four doubles to hold each students test score. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 5:16
1  
std::array<std::array<double,SCORES>,STUDENTS> –  bitmask Apr 29 '13 at 5:25
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's some pretty rough stuff going on in here, but the problem is that you have a semi-colon on all your inner loops except the first one:

for (count2; count2 < SCORES; count2++);

Remove the semi-colon, and the stuff in the braces will become part of the loop.

I'm going to suggest you make your code a little tidier and less error-prone by chucking all those function arguments into their own array when you enter the function, like this:

double *scores[5] = { student1, student2, student3, student4, student5 };

Then you take OUT all that repetition - the copy/paste is what caused your problems to begin with:

for (int i = 0; i < STUDENTS; i++)
{
    cout << "Please enter the name for student " << i+1 << ": ";
    cin >> names[i];
    cout << endl;

    for (int s = 0; s < SCORES; s++)
    {
        cout << "Please enter the grade number " << s+1 << " for " << names[i] <<": ";
        cin >> scores[i][s];
        cout << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that did it. Yes it looks rough, it got rougher and rougher as time passed and I didn't find that silly ; error. Thanks for the help, now time to follow your advice and tidy it up a bit. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 5:37
    
No problem. Just some general advice, you should have immediately questioned how the value of count2 could start at 4 when you ask for the grades. The trailing semi-colon (empty for-loop) thing is a devious and hard-to-spot problem, but questioning your output should have taken you straight to the source. A few experiments (such as switching the (i==0) and (i==1) conditions would have pinpointed that loop as problematic, and you could then try comparing it character-by-character with the working one in order to quickly find the problem. Anyway, happy coding =) –  paddy Apr 29 '13 at 5:43
    
Thanks paddy, I am always thankful to learn new ways to trouble shoot. I am in Programming Fundamentals 1 and don't get much trouble shooting in class it is pretty much learn by doing at home. Thanks again. Also thanks to all the other people that offered a solution I try all of them to learn more. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 5:49
add comment

Why can't you use two nested loops like

  for (int studix=0, stduix<STUDENTS; studix++) { 
     //...
     for (int gradix=0; gradix<SCORE; gradix++) {
        //...
     }
     //....
  }

BTW, the condition could be a more complex one, e.g. with the internal loop being

     bool goodgrade=true;
     for (int gradix=0; goodgrade && gradix<SCORE; gradix++) {
       // you could modify goodgrade or use break; inside the loop
     }

Don't forget the possible use of continue and break inside a loop.

And please, take time to read some good C++ programming book

share|improve this answer
    
the project specifically calls for the use of the 5 arrays holding the 4 grades. I don't see how a nested loop would help me their since I have no way of telling the loop now it is the next arrays turn. Or am I missing somethin? I know there is easier ways of doing this but those are the guidelines I am supposed to code this program by. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 5:22
    
I think you will need to show how to index inside that inner loop since "the project requires" the use of five arrays. Looks like double *gradeArray[STUDENTS]; is part of a solution. Then gradeArray[0]=student1; etc. –  Floris Apr 29 '13 at 5:24
    
Do you know about the break and continue statements –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 29 '13 at 5:24
    
yes break takes me out of the if statement and continue moves to next iteration. let me try that. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 5:28
add comment

Building on Basile's answer and my comments:

int main()
{
string names[STUDENTS]  = {""};
char grades[STUDENTS]   = {""};
double student1[SCORES] = {0};
double student2[SCORES] = {0};
double student3[SCORES] = {0};
double student4[SCORES] = {0};
double student5[SCORES] = {0};

double *gradeArray[STUDENTS];
gradeArray[0] = student1;
gradeArray[1] = student2;
gradeArray[2] = student3;
gradeArray[3] = student4;
gradeArray[4] = student5;

for (int studix=0, stduix<STUDENTS; studix++) { 
 // get the name of the student
 for (int gradix=0; gradix<SCORE; gradix++) {
    // put the grades in gradeArray[studix][gradix]...

 }
 //....
}

Yes, I know about 2 D arrays, but I am trying to make explicit how this can be done with "five individual arrays". Clumsy, but I believe this works.

share|improve this answer
    
when you are doing double *gradeArray[STUDENTS]; what does the * do to the array? Sorry for the stupid question I am in Programming Fundamentals 1 and have not gotten to that yet. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 5:52
1  
Same thing that @paddy did in his answer... I declare an "array of pointers" - since the "name" of an array is actually a pointer. So when you have double student1[5], student1 is actually a pointer (to the first element). When you create an array of pointers, you can "pick which array to use" - in my example, gradeArray[2] points to the start of student3, so gradeArray[2][3] is the 4th grade of student 3 (remember arrays start at zero). Does that explain it for you? –  Floris Apr 29 '13 at 5:56
    
Just to clarify: double *anything declares anything to be of the type pointer to double. And pointers and arrays have a very intimate relationship - this is critical to understanding a lot of C (and C++) code, and well worth getting your brain around. A common mistake is using pointers without making sure that they point to a valid address - memory set aside for you. This is done automatically for you when you declare double myArray[5] - but a lot of power is unlocked by really understanding what pointers do. –  Floris Apr 29 '13 at 6:00
    
our teacher keeps telling us that it really gets fun when we talk about pointer but we just got done with arrays and not much hope that we will make to pointers this semester looks like I will have to figure this out on my own. I am starting to see that pointers make thinks easier. –  Marc Usa Apr 29 '13 at 6:09
1  
Yes - it does get fun. A little confusing at first, but fun. It's one of those things you just have to start using, and suddenly it clicks. But you will have a few SEGFAULTS before you really get it. We've all been there. Definitely worth the effort, though! But when you are using arrays, you are already using pointers - you just don't know it. myArray[2] is actually the same as *(myArray + 2). ("the element you get when you point two locations past the point where myArray is pointing). Lots of learn - have fun on the journey! –  Floris Apr 30 '13 at 1:39
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