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I asked a similar question before, but now I'm looking for a why this isn't working instead of "help me fix".

I have to create a general tree that looks like this:

                       1
                       /
                      v
                      2->3->4
                     /      /  
                    v       v
                    5-6-7   8-9 

My search method, which I use for every other method in the class, is

gennode* general::search(int element, gennode *t){
  if(t == NULL)
  {
   return t;
  }
  if(t->item == element)
  {
  return t;
  }
  if(t->siblingList != NULL)
  {
  return search(element, t->siblingList)
  }
  return search(element, t->firstChild)
}

Where firstChild is the vertical pointers in the picture and siblingList is the horizontal pointers in the picture.

My issue is that it is not finding 5, 6, or 7(the children of 2).

The recursive stack looks like this(at least I think it should in my head):

search(5, *1)
search(5, *2)
search(5, *3)
search(5, *4)
search(5, *8)
search(5, *9)
return NULL(from *9)
return NULL(from *8)
return NULL(from *3)
search(5, *5)
return(*5) the rest of the way up.

Does anyone know where I am getting lost?

share|improve this question
    
just a guess, i think you should have else ifs instead of just ifs. –  Koushik Apr 29 '13 at 5:54
    
By the way, it is a binary tree (2 childs from each node) but it's not an ordered binary tree. –  Roee Gavirel Apr 29 '13 at 6:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to to control NULL result in the sibling search:

gennode* general::search(int element, gennode *t){
  if(t == NULL)
  {
    return t;
  }
  if(t->item == element)
  {
    return t;
  }
  gennode* result = NULL;
  if(t->siblingList != NULL)
  {
    result = search(element, t->siblingList)
  }
  if(result==NULL)
  {
    result = search(element, t->firstChild);
  }
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not what to search first. Is that, on fail, the other way must be attempted. You solved because you did not return on fail! –  Emilio Garavaglia Apr 29 '13 at 5:57
    
This seems like it should be in the right directions, but I got a seg fault when I was searching for 2. –  marcinx27 Apr 29 '13 at 5:58
    
@marcinx27, edited, it should be fixed now –  FatihK Apr 29 '13 at 6:00

your problem was here, it t->siblingList != NULL you never got to t->FirstChild.

gennode* general::search(int element, gennode *t){
    if(t == NULL)
    {
        return t;
    }
    if(t->item == element)
    {
        return t;
    }
    gennode* sibValue = search(element, t->siblingList);
    if(sibValue != NULL)
    {
        return sibValue;// <-- only return if you have a valid value.
    }
    return search(element, t->firstChild)
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is in

  if(t->siblingList != NULL)
  {
  return search(element, t->siblingList)
  }

The return statement makes the function return in any case if there are siblings, independently if something was found or not.

On node 2, you will return having it 3 as a sibling, and the "child" descendance will never be attempted.

This way should be correct

gennode* general::search(int element, gennode *t)
{
  if(t == NULL) //no search at all
  { return NULL; }
  if(t->item == element) // found
  { return t; }
  gennode* z = search(element, t->siblingList);
  if(z) return z; // if found return, otherwise ....
  return search(element, t->firstChild); //... try the other way round
}
share|improve this answer
    
you don't have to check t->siblingList != NULL because the function will take care of it. –  Roee Gavirel Apr 29 '13 at 6:08
1  
@Roee Gavirel ... Also firstChild ... FIXED –  Emilio Garavaglia Apr 29 '13 at 6:25

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