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Below is the assignment for the bash shell script I'm writing. I'm having a problem with -u information being output even though I am using the -f option. This class is a beginner class, so please bear with me. Would be grateful to have some input on my code. Thanks for taking the time to check this out if you do.

Here is the sample output:

[***@***]$ chk3 -f share

share is a directory and it is readable | writable | executable | abecker is currently logged in their home directory is /students/abecker

Here is the usage

chk -f filepath
  • If filepath exists, output in readable sentences
  • if it is a symbolic link, say so. You do not have to continue and report the permissions.
  • if it doesn't exist, say so. Don't continue to report the permissions
  • report what it is: file, directory, or something else, and continue to report the permissions:
  • report what combination of read, write and execute access rights your program has for the data. Note that this is dependent on who runs your program. Do not attempt to do this by looking at the permissions as output by ls -l. You must use the test operators to do this.
  • If filepath does not exist (and is not a symbolic link), your program should report this instead in an informative error message. In this case, you should exit with an error.
chk -u user
  • If the user exists on the system, report
  • the path to the user's home directory
  • if the user is currently logged in, say so. Otherwise, report when they last logged in. (Take some care so that this is generated reliably and quickly.)
  • If the user doesn't exist, report this in an informative error message, and exit with an error.

Here is my code

#!/bin/bash
if [ $# -gt 2 ]
then
  echo "only 2 aruments can be used"
  exit 1
fi
if [ "$1" != '-f' -a "$1" != '-u' ]
then
  echo "first argument must be -f or -u"
  exit 1
fi
if [ "$1" = '-f' -a $# -ne 2 ]
then
  echo 'Usage: chk -f [FILEPATH]'
  exit 1
fi
if [ "$1" = '-f' ]
then
  FILEPATH=$2
fi
if [ -L "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo  "$FILEPATH is a symbolic link"
  exit 0
elif  [ -d "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo -e "$(basename "$FILEPATH") is a directory and it is \c"
elif [ -f "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo -e "$(basename "$FILEPATH") is a file and it is \c"
else
  echo "I cannot determine what $(basename "$FILEPATH") is"
  exit 1
fi
if [ -r "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo -e "readable | \c"
fi
if [ -w "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo -e "writable | \c"
fi
if [ -x "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo -e "executable | \c"
fi
if [ "$1" = '-u' -a $# -eq 1 ]
then
  USER=$LOGNAME
elif [ "$1" = '-u' -a $# -eq 2 ]
then
  USER=$2
fi
USERINFO=$(grep "^$USER:" /etc/passwd)
if ! grep "^$USER:" /etc/passwd > /dev/null
then
  echo "$USER cannot be found on this system"
  exit 1
fi
if ! who | grep "^$USER " > /dev/null
then
  echo "$USER is not currently logged on and last logged on"
  echo "$(last -1 "$USER")"
  exit 0
else
  echo "$USER is currently logged in their home directory is"
  echo "$(echo "$USERINFO" | awk -F":" '{print $6}')"
fi
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You're not putting the processing of different options into different blocks; the code simply passes through everything for all options.

e.g. for the -f option, you have:

if [ "$1" = '-f' ]
then
  FILEPATH=$2
fi

and then process all the options for filepath, without putting them into the if statement, so if you pass in either -f or -u, it always passes into the code:

if [ -L "$FILEPATH" ]
then
  echo  "$FILEPATH is a symbolic link"
  exit 0
elif

If you don't want to break your program into functions, what you want to do is put all the code relating to processing the -f option into the same if-statement, somewhat like:

if [ "$1" = '-f' ]
then
  FILEPATH=$2
  if [ -L "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo  "$FILEPATH is a symbolic link"
    exit 0
  elif  [ -d "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "$(basename "$FILEPATH") is a directory and it is \c"
  elif [ -f "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "$(basename "$FILEPATH") is a file and it is \c"
  else
    echo "I cannot determine what $(basename "$FILEPATH") is"
    exit 1
  fi
  if [ -r "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "readable | \c"
  fi
  if [ -w "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "writable | \c"
  fi
  if [ -x "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "executable | \c"
  fi
fi # if [ "$1" = '-f' ]

Similarly for the -u option, you need to break it into multiple statements and then process all the options for the statement:

if [ "$1" = 'u' ]
then
  if [ $# -eq 1 ]
  then
    USER=$LOGNAME
  elif [ $# -eq 2 ]
  then
    USER=$2
  fi
  USERINFO=$(grep "^$USER:" /etc/passwd)
  if ! grep "^$USER:" /etc/passwd > /dev/null
  then
    echo "$USER cannot be found on this system"
    exit 1
  fi
  if ! who | grep "^$USER " > /dev/null
  then
    echo "$USER is not currently logged on and last logged on"
    echo "$(last -1 "$USER")"
    exit 0
  else
    echo "$USER is currently logged in their home directory is"
    echo "$(echo "$USERINFO" | awk -F":" '{print $6}')"
  fi
fi # if [ "$1" = '-u' ]

I would, however recommend putting the code that acts on the options into shell functions, which makes it much easier to read the code; e.g.

filepath() {
  FILEPATH="$1"
  if [ -L "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo  "$FILEPATH is a symbolic link"
    exit 0
  elif  [ -d "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "$(basename "$FILEPATH") is a directory and it is \c"
  elif [ -f "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "$(basename "$FILEPATH") is a file and it is \c"
  else
    echo "I cannot determine what $(basename "$FILEPATH") is"
    exit 1
  fi
  if [ -r "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "readable | \c"
  fi
  if [ -w "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "writable | \c"
  fi
  if [ -x "$FILEPATH" ]
  then
    echo -e "executable | \c"
  fi
}

And then for the processing code:

if [ "$1" = '-f' ]
then
  filepath "$2"
fi

and something similar for the -u option.

share|improve this answer
    
I felt it was something like that, but didn't know what to do with it. My instructor was distracted with his own problem and didn't give a very good explanation. So thanks! We just learned about functions and they cannot be used on this assignment, but can be used in the following one. –  user1655887 Apr 29 '13 at 18:39

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