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I have a few classes that frequently communicate with a service. Message are sent using

private void sendMessage(int what)
{
    Message msg = Message.obtain(null, what);
    try
    {
        mServerMessenger.send(msg);
    }
    catch (RemoteException e)
    {

    }
}  

My question is

  • Should I declare a class member Message mMessage instead of declaring it locally.

  • If declare as a class member should I use the Message constructor or use Message.obtain.

  • As class member do I need to call recycle in onDestroy if using Message.obtain.

So far I do not experience any memory problem, but I would like to use the system resource as efficiently as possible.

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1 Answer 1

This would be my 2c on this:

1) Should I declare a class member Message mMessage instead of declaring it locally.

I would like to have a class member so that JVM don't have to create entry for local variable at each method call..

2) If declare as a class member should I use the Message constructor or use Message.obtain.

Always use obtain() since it use object pooling..

3) As class member do I need to call recycle in onDestroy if using Message.obtain.

You don't need to call recycle just nullify the class variable.

you can have a look at the Message.java source for more info..

I would also go through it and update the post if I found anything more..

EDIT1:

Again I would request you to check the source code.. The recycle() method should be called if you want to return the object to the global object pool.. You should not use the object after calling the recycle method.. Copying the method (ICS) for quick reference:

/**
 * Return a Message instance to the global pool.  You MUST NOT touch
 * the Message after calling this function -- it has effectively been
 * freed.
 */
public void recycle() {
    clearForRecycle();

    synchronized (sPoolSync) {
        if (sPoolSize < MAX_POOL_SIZE) {
            next = sPool;
            sPool = this;
            sPoolSize++;
        }
    }
}

The instance would be available for you to use as long as you don't call 'recyle()'. So in case it would be good practice to call recycle() before calling the obtain() method in your code.. and in the onDestroy() call recycle() and nullify the object..

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I read the document but it is not clear. For example, obtain() is from a global pool but if I use a constructor then is it also pull out from the global pool. Is there a guarantee that the message exists as long as my class exist if using obtain()? In what situation should one call recycle()? –  Hoan Nguyen Apr 29 '13 at 7:42
    
check my edit.. –  Praful Bhatnagar Apr 29 '13 at 7:52
    
+1 for source code link. The pool size is only 10, so if I keep it for a life time of my classes which is all the time, I may use 5 of them. So I do not know if this is a good idea. There will be more garbage collection but maybe my service will be less likely to be killed by the system. –  Hoan Nguyen Apr 29 '13 at 8:07
    
if you call recycle() before calling obtain() then most of the time you may end up using the recycled object. and it is always good to avoid creating new object.. –  Praful Bhatnagar Apr 29 '13 at 9:09
    
I think if I declared as a class member I should use the constructor, that way I do not deplete the global pool. If I used obtain(), then at any time the global pool would only have 5 left for the entire system. –  Hoan Nguyen Apr 29 '13 at 9:14

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