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I was to create a code where I mimic the functions of a robot. Turning and moving and such. I feel as if I'm approaching this in all the wrong ways... When I was writing this I thought I understood the gist of it, if the direction in the constructor is this then if it turn the new direction is this. I tested this and of course I ended up with some real incorrect results. I'm absolutely sure that I don't actually use any of these functions for my object. Can I get a tip about how to work this kind of code?

import java.awt.Point;
public class Robot
{
private int x;
private int y;
private int d;
private int p;
public static final int NORTH = 0;
public static final int SOUTH = 1;
public static final int EAST = 2;
public static final int WEST = 3;

/**
 * Constructor for objects of class Robot
 * @param theX the x coordinate
 * @param theY the y coordinate
 * @param theDirection the direction the robot is facing
 */
public Robot(int theX, int theY, int theDirection)
{
    x = theX;
    y = theY;
    d = theDirection;
}

public void turnLeft()
{
    if(d == NORTH) {
        d = WEST;
    }
    if(d == WEST) {
        d = SOUTH;
    }
    if(d == SOUTH) {
        d = EAST;
    }
    if(d == EAST) {
        d = NORTH;
    }
}



public String getDirection()
{
    if(d == NORTH) {
        return "N";
    }
    if(d == SOUTH) {
        return "S";
    }
    if(d == WEST) {
        return "W";
    }
    if(d == EAST) {
        return "E";
    }   
    return "";
}
}

Testing

Robot rob = new Robot(20, 20, Robot.SOUTH);
rob.turnLeft;
System.out.println(rob.getDirection);

this return S when I think it should actually return E.

share|improve this question
    
Your turnLeft() is mixing p and d. –  Aquillo Apr 29 '13 at 7:54
    
sorry, this was my code before I fixed my p and d i'll edit it! –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 7:55
    
wait isn't d the direction? –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 7:56
    
@Michael We can answer your question, not asking it :) –  Maroun Maroun Apr 29 '13 at 7:57
1  
@MarounMaroun I'm lost now :( Is it that I'm not actually asking a question? –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 8:00

6 Answers 6

You need else if. When you turn left you assign a new value to d which is matching the condition of the following if statements.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, you can't just have entire if statements! –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 8:11
    
@Michael You can. But think about this: 1st) d is North, so you enter the brackets of the first if. You set it to be West. 2nd) d is West, so you enter the brackets on the second if. You set it to be South. (..) And so on. That's what Mitch is trying to say. –  Aquillo Apr 29 '13 at 8:38

Your turnLeft method is not quite right.
Here's the code by using if:

public void turnLeft() {
  if (d == NORTH) {
      d = WEST;
  } else if (d == WEST) {
      d = SOUTH;
  } else if (d == SOUTH) {
      d = EAST;
  } else if (d == EAST) {
      d = NORTH;
  }
}

Here's the code by using switch..case

public void turnLeft() {

  switch (d) {
    case NORTH: d = WEST; break;
    case WEST: d = SOUTH; break;
    case SOUTH: d = EAST; break;
    case EAST: d = NORTH; break;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Alexander is right, in OP's case (without else if) you would enter each if since you're overwriting the tested value. –  Aquillo Apr 29 '13 at 8:36

Enum

public enum Direction {
    private String name;
    private String indicator;

    public Direction(String name, String indicator) {
        this.name = name;
        this.indicator= indicator;
    }

    // getters

    NORTH("North", "N"),
    EAST("East", "E"),
    SOUTH("South", "S"),
    WEST("West", "W");
}

Next you can easily do this:

turnLeft() {
   switch (d) {
        case Direction.NORTH: return Direction.WEST;
        case Direction.WEST:  return Direction.SOUTH;
        case Direction.SOUTH: return Direction.EAST;
        case Direction.EAST:  return Direction.NORTH;
    }
}

getDirection() {
    return d.getIndicator();
}

This way you can get rid of the four static int (NORTH, WEST, EAST, SOUTH) and change int d into Direction d. I would really recommend using an enum for this. Just to be typesafe.

share|improve this answer
    
you should at the fact, that the type of d has to be changed to Direction - just for completeness –  Marco Forberg Apr 29 '13 at 8:36
    
@MarcoForberg: Perhaps you read my answer just before my edit. I've made a small edit in which I've made a note of it. –  Aquillo Apr 29 '13 at 8:39
    
yes looks like i did just that –  Marco Forberg Apr 29 '13 at 8:41
1  
short is a basic type, you can't use it as a variable name so this one won't compile unless you replace String short with something else. –  StepTNT Apr 29 '13 at 8:53
1  
@StepTNT: Superb for noticing this. I am at work so don't have an IDE at hand, will change it right away. –  Aquillo Apr 29 '13 at 8:54

What's the p var that you're using? Your current direction is stored in d

...
d = theDirection;
...

You should try with this one:

public void turnLeft()
{
    if(d == NORTH) {
        d = WEST;
    }
    if(d == WEST) {
        d = SOUTH;
    }
    if(d == SOUTH) {
        d = EAST;
    }
    if(d == EAST) {
        d = NORTH;
    }
}

EDIT: Just to clarify.

You wrote something like

if(p == SOUTH) {
        d = EAST;
    }

So you're checking if p is SOUTH and not d.

You're not using p anywhere so it will never be SOUTH, that's why your turnLeft() method does absolutely nothing!

share|improve this answer
    
the p var is another part of my code where I have to return the point at which the robot lies. I think I just messed up my code... and added p there by mistake.. oh dear –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 8:06
    
Yeah, I think you've messed it up because in your getDirection() you're doing it right! –  StepTNT Apr 29 '13 at 8:10
    
Thank you! With all this information I can finish the rest of the code now! :) –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 8:13
    
@StepTNT There is a difference between helping someone learn how to accept/vote, and asking them to accept/vote for your content. the first is OK; the second is not. –  Andrew Barber Apr 29 '13 at 15:05
public void turnLeft()
{
    if(d == NORTH) {
        d = WEST;
    }
    else if(d == WEST) {
        d = SOUTH;
    }
    else if(d == SOUTH) {
        d = EAST;
    }
    else if(d == EAST) {
        d = NORTH;
    }
}

Because if d == NORTH, then d will become WEST.

And in the next if, d will indeed bed==WEST, and will become SOUTH.

And at the end of the day, d will be NORTH again.

share|improve this answer

1st) you should really clean up your p and d stuff ;) i suggest to call d "direction"

2nd) you should rearrange your int constants for directions in clockwise order. so you could reduce your turnLeft() method to a single line of code. You could order them this way:

public static final int NORTH = 0;
public static final int EAST = 1;
public static final int SOUTH = 2;
public static final int WEST = 3;

3rd) for testing you should use JUnit:

@Test
public void turnLeft() {
    Robot rob = new Robot(20, 20, Robot.SOUTH);
    rob.turnLeft;
    assertEquals("E", rob.getDirection);
    rob.turnLeft;
    assertEquals("N", rob.getDirection);
    rob.turnLeft;
    assertEquals("W", rob.getDirection);
    rob.turnLeft;
    assertEquals("S", rob.getDirection);
}
share|improve this answer
    
clockwise order? :O –  Michael Apr 29 '13 at 8:10
    
@Michael: edited my answer –  Marco Forberg Apr 29 '13 at 8:12

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